Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning on Agricultural Drones Market investigated in the latest research

| February 12, 2020

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The agricultural drones market is projected to grow from $1.5 billion in 2018 to $6.2 billion in 2024, experiencing a 25.0% CAGR during 2019–2024 (forecast period). Crop spraying was the largest category in 2018, based on application, owing to the rising prevalence of fungal plant diseases caused by the Verticillium and Rhizoctonia fungi, which are spread by bollworm and flat armyworm.As these diseases destroy the yield, the agrarian community is deploying drones, also called unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), to kill the pathogen.The rising adoption of such platforms for crop spraying is one of the key agricultural drones market trends. With UAVs, farmers can track their crops in distant locations in real time.Further, such vehicles ensure efficiency, by spraying only the required amount of liquid, which also checks wastage. For the purpose, multi-rotor UAVs are the most preferred choice, as they can hover over the spray zone.Currently, North America witnesses the heaviest utilization of drones for spraying insecticides and pesticides.The major driver for the agricultural drones market is the focus of farmers on enhancing the yield. Images to asses soil and field quality, crop growth and health, and hydric-stress areas are provided on a real-time basis by UAVs.

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Thinking Like a Data Scientist

Article | December 23, 2020

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Article | April 13, 2020

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Article | April 9, 2020

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Time Machine Big Data of the Past for the Future of Europe

Article | February 24, 2020

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XLAB

XLAB is an IT solution company focused on management and automation in the Cloud, Remote Desktop, Visualization, CyberSecurity, IoT, HPC and Data Analytics, with its own interdisciplinary research team. 17 years on, and in a team of 120+, the company has become a synonym for technology innovation and excellence, open exchange of ideas, teamwork and – fun.

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