Big Data in Banking

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Big data can help meet today's regulatory challenges in the banking and financial services industries.The banking industry has evolved by leaps and bounds over the past decade, when it comes to ... How big data is making bigger and better mobile apps.

Spotlight

Quantivo Corporation

Quantivo provides OnDemand analytic solutions to help companies perform large-scale data analysis at an absolute fraction of today's costs. Through patented technology that translates data into useful information, companies can leverage Quantivo's SaaS business intelligence solutions to gain a competitive edge. Quantivo has existing Fortune 1000 customers, revenue and is backed by two top-tier Silicon Valley venture capital firms. If you are interested in joining a growing Silicon Valley software start-up, read through our open positions. We look forward to hearing from you…

OTHER ARTICLES

MODERNIZED REQUIREMENTS OF EFFICIENT DATA SCIENCE SUCCESS ACROSS ORGANIZATIONS

Article | February 23, 2020

Does the success of companies like Google depend on that of the algorithms or that of data? Today’s fascination with artificial intelligence (AI) reflects both our appetite for data and our excitement about the new opportunities in machine learning. Amalio Telenti, Chief Data Scientist and Head of Computational Biology at Vir Biotechnology Inc. argue that newcomers to the field of data science are blinded by the shiny object of magical algorithms and that they forget the critical infrastructures that are needed to create and to manage data in the first place.Data management and infrastructures are the little ugly duckling of data science but they are necessary for a successful program and therefore need to be built with purpose. This requires careful consideration of strategies for data capture, storage of raw and processed data and instruments for retrieval. Beyond the virtues of analysis, there are also the benefits of facilitated retrieval. While there are many solutions for visualization of corporate or industrial data, there is still a need for flexible retrieval tools in the form of search engines that query the diverse sources and forms of data and information that are generated at a given company or institution.

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BIG DATA MANAGEMENT

How can machine learning detect money laundering?

Article | February 23, 2020

In this article, we will explore different techniques to detect money laundering activities. Notwithstanding, regardless of various expected applications inside the financial services sector, explicitly inside the Anti-Money Laundering (AML) appropriation of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning (ML) has been generally moderate. What is Money Laundering, Anti Money Laundering? Money Laundering is where someone unlawfully obtains money and moves it to cover up their crimes. Anti-Money Laundering can be characterized as an activity that forestalls or aims to forestall money laundering from occurring. It is assessed by UNO that, money-laundering exchanges account in one year is 2–5% of worldwide GDP or $800 billion — $3 trillion in USD. In 2019, regulators and governmental offices exacted fines of more than $8.14 billion. Indeed, even with these stunning numbers, gauges are that just about 1 % of unlawful worldwide money related streams are ever seized by the specialists. AML activities in banks expend an over the top measure of manpower, assets, and cash flow to deal with the process and comply with the guidelines. What are the punishments for money laundering? In 2019, Celent evaluated that spending came to $8.3 billion and $23.4 billion for technology and operations, individually. This speculation is designated toward guaranteeing anti-money laundering. As we have seen much of the time, reputational costs can likewise convey a hefty price. In 2012, HSBC laundering of an expected £5.57 billion over at least seven years.   What is the current situation of the banks applying ML to stop money laundering? Given the plenty of new instruments the banks have accessible, the potential feature risk, the measure of capital involved, and the gigantic expenses as a form of fines and punishments, this should not be the situation. A solid impact by nations to curb illicit cash movement has brought about a huge yet amazingly little part of money laundering being recognized — a triumph rate of about 2% average. Dutch banks — ABN Amro, Rabobank, ING, Triodos Bank, and Volksbank announced in September 2019 to work toward a joint transaction monitoring to stand-up fight against Money Laundering. A typical challenge in transaction monitoring, for instance, is the generation of a countless number of alerts, which thusly requires operation teams to triage and process the alarms. ML models can identify and perceive dubious conduct and besides they can classify alerts into different classes such as critical, high, medium, or low risk. Critical or High alerts may be directed to senior experts on a high need to quickly explore the issue. Today is the immense number of false positives, gauges show that the normal, of false positives being produced, is the range of 95 and 99%, and this puts extraordinary weight on banks. The examination of false positives is tedious and costs money. An ongoing report found that banks were spending near 3.01€ billion every year exploring false positives. Establishments are looking for increasing productive ways to deal with crime and, in this specific situation, Machine Learning can end up being a significant tool. Financial activities become productive, the gigantic sum and speed of money related exchanges require a viable monitoring framework that can process exchanges rapidly, ideally in real-time.   What are the types of machine learning algorithms which can identify money laundering transactions? Supervised Machine Learning, it is essential to have historical information with events precisely assigned and input variables appropriately captured. If biases or errors are left in the data without being dealt with, they will get passed on to the model, bringing about erroneous models. It is smarter to utilize Unsupervised Machine Learning to have historical data with events accurately assigned. It sees an obscure pattern and results. It recognizes suspicious activity without earlier information of exactly what a money-laundering scheme resembles. What are the different techniques to detect money laundering? K-means Sequence Miner algorithm: Entering banking transactions, at that point running frequent pattern mining algorithms and mining transactions to distinguish money laundering. Clustering transactions and dubious activities to money laundering lastly show them on a chart. Time Series Euclidean distance: Presenting a sequence matching algorithm to distinguish money laundering detection, utilizing sequential detection of suspicious transactions. This method exploits the two references to recognize dubious transactions: a history of every individual’s account and exchange data with different accounts. Bayesian networks: It makes a model of the user’s previous activities, and this model will be a measure of future customer activities. In the event that the exchange or user financial transactions have. Cluster-based local outlier factor algorithm: The money laundering detection utilizing clustering techniques combination and Outliers.   Conclusion For banks, now is the ideal opportunity to deploy ML models into their ecosystem. Despite this opportunity, increased knowledge and the number of ML implementations prompted a discussion about the feasibility of these solutions and the degree to which ML should be trusted and potentially replace human analysis and decision-making. In order to further exploit and achieve ML promise, banks need to continue to expand on its awareness of ML strengths, risks, and limitations and, most critically, to create an ethical system by which the production and use of ML can be controlled and the feasibility and effect of these emerging models proven and eventually trusted.

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DATA ARCHITECTURE

Evolution of capabilities of Data Platforms & data ecosystem

Article | February 23, 2020

Data Platforms and frameworks have been constantly evolving. At some point of time; we are excited by Hadoop (well for almost 10 years); followed by Snowflake or as I say Snowflake Blizzard (who managed to launch biggest IPO win historically) and the Google (Google solves problems and serves use cases in a way that few companies can match). The end of the data warehouse Once upon a time, life was simple; or at least, the basic approach to Business Intelligence was fairly easy to describe… A process of collecting information from systems, building a repository of consistent data, and bolting on one or more reporting and visualisation tools which presented information to users. Data used to be managed in expensive, slow, inaccessible SQL data warehouses. SQL systems were notorious for their lack of scalability. Their demise is coming from a few technological advances. One of these is the ubiquitous, and growing, Hadoop. On April 1, 2006, Apache Hadoop was unleashed upon Silicon Valley. Inspired by Google, Hadoop’s primary purpose was to improve the flexibility and scalability of data processing by splitting the process into smaller functions that run on commodity hardware. Hadoop’s intent was to replace enterprise data warehouses based on SQL. Unfortunately, a technology used by Google may not be the best solution for everyone else. It’s not that others are incompetent: Google solves problems and serves use cases in a way that few companies can match. Google has been running massive-scale applications such as its eponymous search engine, YouTube and the Ads platform. The technologies and infrastructure that make the geographically distributed offerings perform at scale are what make various components of Google Cloud Platform enterprise ready and well-featured. Google has shown leadership in developing innovations that have been made available to the open-source community and are being used extensively by other public cloud vendors and Gartner clients. Examples of these include the Kubernetes container management framework, TensorFlow machine learning platform and the Apache Beam data processing programming model. GCP also uses open-source offerings in its cloud while treating third-party data and analytics providers as first-class citizens on its cloud and providing unified billing for its customers. The examples of the latter include DataStax, Redis Labs, InfluxData, MongoDB, Elastic, Neo4j and Confluent. Silicon Valley tried to make Hadoop work. The technology was extremely complicated and nearly impossible to use efficiently. Hadoop’s lack of speed was compounded by its focus on unstructured data — you had to be a “flip-flop wearing” data scientist to truly make use of it. Unstructured datasets are very difficult to query and analyze without deep knowledge of computer science. At one point, Gartner estimated that 70% of Hadoop deployments would not achieve the goal of cost savings and revenue growth, mainly due to insufficient skills and technical integration difficulties. And seventy percent seems like an understatement. Data storage through the years: from GFS to Snowflake or Snowflake blizzard Developing in parallel with Hadoop’s journey was that of Marcin Zukowski — co-founder and CEO of Vectorwise. Marcin took the data warehouse in another direction, to the world of advanced vector processing. Despite being almost unheard of among the general public, Snowflake was actually founded back in 2012. Firstly, Snowflake is not a consumer tech firm like Netflix or Uber. It's business-to-business only, which may explain its high valuation – enterprise companies are often seen as a more "stable" investment. In short, Snowflake helps businesses manage data that's stored on the cloud. The firm's motto is "mobilising the world's data", because it allows big companies to make better use of their vast data stores. Marcin and his teammates rethought the data warehouse by leveraging the elasticity of the public cloud in an unexpected way: separating storage and compute. Their message was this: don’t pay for a data warehouse you don’t need. Only pay for the storage you need, and add capacity as you go. This is considered one of Snowflake’s key innovations: separating storage (where the data is held) from computing (the act of querying). By offering this service before Google, Amazon, and Microsoft had equivalent products of their own, Snowflake was able to attract customers, and build market share in the data warehousing space. Naming the company after a discredited database concept was very brave. For those of us not in the details of the Snowflake schema, it is a logical arrangement of tables in a multidimensional database such that the entity-relationship diagram resembles a snowflake shape. … When it is completely normalized along all the dimension tables, the resultant structure resembles a snowflake with the fact table in the middle. Needless to say, the “snowflake” schema is as far from Hadoop’s design philosophy as technically possible. While Silicon Valley was headed toward a dead end, Snowflake captured an entire cloud data market.

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Data Analytics Convergence: Business Intelligence(BI) Meets Machine Learning (ML)

Article | February 23, 2020

Headquartered in London, England, BP (NYSE: BP) is a multinational oil and gas company. Operating since 1909, the organization offers its customers with fuel for transportation, energy for heat and light, lubricants to keep engines moving, and the petrochemicals products. Business intelligence has always been a key enabler for improving decision making processes in large enterprises from early days of spreadsheet software to building enterprise data warehouses for housing large sets of enterprise data and to more recent developments of mining those datasets to unearth hidden relationships. One underlying theme throughout this evolution has been the delegation of crucial task of finding out the remarkable relationships between various objects of interest to human beings. What BI technology has been doing, in other words, is to make it possible (and often easy too) to find the needle in the proverbial haystack if you somehow know in which sectors of the barn it is likely to be. It is a validatory as opposed to a predictory technology. When the amount of data is huge in terms of variety, amount, and dimensionality (a.k.a. Big Data) and/or the relationship between datasets are beyond first-order linear relationships amicable to human intuition, the above strategy of relying solely on humans to make essential thinking about the datasets and utilizing machines only for crucial but dumb data infrastructure tasks becomes totally inadequate. The remedy to the problem follows directly from our characterization of it: finding ways to utilize the machines beyond menial tasks and offloading some or most of cognitive work from humans to the machines. Does this mean all the technology and associated practices developed over the decades in BI space are not useful anymore in Big Data age? Not at all. On the contrary, they are more useful than ever: whereas in the past humans were in the driving seat and controlling the demand for the use of the datasets acquired and curated diligently, we have now machines taking up that important role and hence unleashing manifold different ways of using the data and finding out obscure, non-intuitive relationships that allude humans. Moreover, machines can bring unprecedented speed and processing scalability to the game that would be either prohibitively expensive or outright impossible to do with human workforce. Companies have to realize both the enormous potential of using new automated, predictive analytics technologies such as machine learning and how to successfully incorporate and utilize those advanced technologies into the data analysis and processing fabric of their existing infrastructure. It is this marrying of relatively old, stable technologies of data mining, data warehousing, enterprise data models, etc. with the new automated predictive technologies that has the huge potential to unleash the benefits so often being hyped by the vested interests of new tools and applications as the answer to all data analytical problems. To see this in the context of predictive analytics, let's consider the machine learning(ML) technology. The easiest way to understand machine learning would be to look at the simplest ML algorithm: linear regression. ML technology will build on basic interpolation idea of the regression and extend it using sophisticated mathematical techniques that would not necessarily be obvious to the causal users. For example, some ML algorithms would extend linear regression approach to model non-linear (i.e. higher order) relationships between dependent and independent variables in the dataset via clever mathematical transformations (a.k.a kernel methods) that will express those non-linear relationship in a linear form and hence suitable to be run through a linear algorithm. Be it a simple linear algorithm or its more sophisticated kernel methods variation, ML algorithms will not have any context on the data they process. This is both a strength and weakness at the same time. Strength because the same algorithms could process a variety of different kinds of data, allowing us to leverage all the work gone through the development of those algorithms in different business contexts, weakness because since the algorithms lack any contextual understanding of the data, perennial computer science truth of garbage in, garbage out manifests itself unceremoniously here : ML models have to be fed "right" kind of data to draw out correct insights that explain the inner relationships in the data being processed. ML technology provides an impressive set of sophisticated data analysis and modelling algorithms that could find out very intricate relationships among the datasets they process. It provides not only very sophisticated, advanced data analysis and modeling methods but also the ability to use these methods in an automated, hence massively distributed and scalable ways. Its Achilles' heel however is its heavy dependence on the data it is being fed with. Best analytic methods would be useless, as far as drawing out useful insights from them are concerned, if they are applied on the wrong kind of data. More seriously, the use of advanced analytical technology could give a false sense of confidence to their users over the analysis results those methods produce, making the whole undertaking not just useless but actually dangerous. We can address the fundamental weakness of ML technology by deploying its advanced, raw algorithmic processing capabilities in conjunction with the existing data analytics technology whereby contextual data relationships and key domain knowledge coming from existing BI estate (data mining efforts, data warehouses, enterprise data models, business rules, etc.) are used to feed ML analytics pipeline. This approach will combine superior algorithmic processing capabilities of the new ML technology with the enterprise knowledge accumulated through BI efforts and will allow companies build on their existing data analytics investments while transitioning to use incoming advanced technologies. This, I believe, is effectively a win-win situation and will be key to the success of any company involved in data analytics efforts.

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Spotlight

Quantivo Corporation

Quantivo provides OnDemand analytic solutions to help companies perform large-scale data analysis at an absolute fraction of today's costs. Through patented technology that translates data into useful information, companies can leverage Quantivo's SaaS business intelligence solutions to gain a competitive edge. Quantivo has existing Fortune 1000 customers, revenue and is backed by two top-tier Silicon Valley venture capital firms. If you are interested in joining a growing Silicon Valley software start-up, read through our open positions. We look forward to hearing from you…

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