Business Intelligence Management: Get the Most Out of Your BI

| December 4, 2018

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In the past, it was simply data analytics. Now, it’s full business intelligence management (BIM) that incorporates all areas of technologies, strategies, applications, and best practices to optimize business operations, sales, supply chain and, ultimately, growth. What does Business Intelligence Management do for me? Difficult strategic evaluation is now a thing of the past. What once took years of onerous research and data farming can now be accomplished efficiently and effectively with BIM. While many companies look to the next big thing, capitalize on a trend, follow an influencer or develop entirely new ideas – those who use BIM can quickly justify business decisions and subsequent actions that truly align with respective missions and objectives. Sure, it’s easy for any company to say, “We want to increase revenue, reduce operating costs and gain market share.”  All companies want more revenue, less cost and more market share – but to what end and by what means? Such broad objectives may not align with the company’s mission or may disrupt a short-term goal.

Spotlight

OnApproach

OnApproach is a Credit Union Service Organization (CUSO) that focuses on providing credit unions with the power to use data as a competitive advantage both independently and cooperatively. With OnApproach, credit unions can now harness the value of Big Data through integration and predictive analytics. This deeper understanding of data allows credit unions to discover vital trends in member behavior, resulting in improved financial performance, reduced risk, and enriched relationships with members...

OTHER ARTICLES

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Taking a qualitative approach to a data-driven market

Article | February 18, 2021

While digital transformation is proving to have many benefits for businesses, what is perhaps the most significant, is the vast amount of data there is available. And now, with an increasing number of businesses turning their focus to online, there is even more to be collected on competitors and markets than ever before. Having all this information to hand may seem like any business owner’s dream, as they can now make insightful and informed commercial decisions based on what others are doing, what customers want and where markets are heading. But according to Nate Burke, CEO of Diginius, a propriety software and solutions provider for ecommerce businesses, data should not be all a company relies upon when making important decisions. Instead, there is a line to be drawn on where data is required and where human expertise and judgement can provide greater value. Undeniably, the power of data is unmatched. 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While on the other hand, businesses who ignored, or simply did not utilise the information available to them, would have been left with overstocked shops and now, out of season items that would have to be heavily discounted or worse, disposed of. Similarly, search and sales data can be used to understand changing consumer needs, and consequently, what items businesses should be ordering, manufacturing, marketing and selling for the best returns. For instance, understandably, in 2020, DIY was at its peak, with increases in searches for “DIY facemasks”, “DIY decking” and “DIY garden ideas”. For those who had recognised the trend early on, they had the chance to shift their offerings and marketing in accordance, in turn really reaping the rewards. So, paying attention to data certainly does pay off. 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Although, this may add fuel to the next issue. Drawing a line The benefits of data and insights are clear, particularly as the tasks of collection and analysis become less of a burden for businesses and their people thanks to automation and AI advancements. But due to how effortless data collection and analysis is becoming, we can only expect more businesses to be doing it, meaning its ability to offer each individual company something unique is also being lessened. So, businesses need to look elsewhere for their edge. And interestingly, this is where a line should be drawn and human judgement should be used in order to set them apart from the competition and differentiate from what everyone else is doing. It makes perfect sense when you think about it. Your business is unique for a number of reasons, but mainly because of the brand, its values, reputation and perceptions of the services you are upheld by. 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Human judgement, however, can listen to and understand qualitative feedback and consumer sentiments which can often provide much more meaningful insights for businesses to base their decisions on. So, when it comes to competitor analysis, using insights generated from figure-based data sets and performance metrics is key to ensuring you are doing the same as the competition. But if you are looking to get ahead, you may want to consider taking a human approach too.

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Spotlight

OnApproach

OnApproach is a Credit Union Service Organization (CUSO) that focuses on providing credit unions with the power to use data as a competitive advantage both independently and cooperatively. With OnApproach, credit unions can now harness the value of Big Data through integration and predictive analytics. This deeper understanding of data allows credit unions to discover vital trends in member behavior, resulting in improved financial performance, reduced risk, and enriched relationships with members...

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