Businesses must integrate Artificial Intelligence (AI) now or fall further behind

| January 28, 2019

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Artificial intelligence became one of the hottest tech topics in 2017 and is still attracting attention and investments. Although scientists have been working on the technology and heralding its numerous anticipated benefits for more than four decades, it’s only in the past few years that society’s artificial intelligence dreams have come to fruition. The impact AI applications stand to have on both consumer and business operations is profound. For example, a New York-based Harley Davidson dealer incorporated the Albert Algorithm AI-driven marketing platform into his marketing mix and saw a 2,930 percent increase in sales leads that helped triple his business over the previous year. Unfortunately, success stories like this aren’t as common as the more prevalent failed AI pilot projects. However, with growing volumes of raw data about people, places, and things, plus increasing compute power and real-time processing speeds, immediate AI applicability and business benefits are becoming a reality.

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Article | October 27, 2020

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