From Insights to Action - 2016 Marketing Analytics Conference

NIREN SIROHI, PH.D. | June 16, 2016

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Join me at the 2016 Marketing Analytics Conference (MAC16) June 23-24 at the JW Marriott in Austin, TX. The Direct Marketing Association will be hosting this year’s conference, From Insights to Action where attendees will hear about Promising and Practical Data Science Strategies from some of the world’s best known brands including: Coca Cola, NASA, Taco Bell, John Hancock, Mary Kay, Facebook, Kellogg’s, GE, Target and more.

Spotlight

Specture Labs IoT

Specture Labs is a category-defining decision science, IOT and big data analytics company, helping enterprises systematize better data-driven decision making. Specture Labs help companies make better decisions every day. The Specture Labs Decision Engineering Methodology is a proven, methodical approach that changes the way companies leverage their data. By building quantitative analytics-based decisions and scalable solutions, our clients generate better outcome, faster every time. And see the results in their top and bottom line.

OTHER ARTICLES

The Importance of Data Governance

Article | September 7, 2021

Data has settled into regular business practices. Executives in every industry are looking for ways to optimize processes through the implementation of data. Doing business without analytics is just shooting yourself in the foot. Yet, global business efforts to embrace data-transformation haven't had resounding success. There are many reasons for the challenging course, however, people and process management has been cited as the common thread. A combination of people touting data as the “new oil” and everyone scrambling to obtain business intelligence has led to information being considered an end in itself. While the idea of becoming a data-driven organization is extremely beneficial, the execution is often lacking. In some areas of business, action over strategy can bring tremendous results. However, in data governance such an approach often results in a hectic period of implementations, new processes, and uncoordinated decision-making. What I propose is to proceed with a good strategy and sound data governance principles in mind. Auditing data for quality Within a data governance framework, information turns into an asset. Proper data governance is essentially informational accounting. There are numerous rules, regulations, and guidelines to make governance ensure quality. While boiling down the process into one concept would be reductionist, by far the most important topic in all information management and governance is data quality. Data quality can be loosely defined as the degree to which data is accurate, complete, timely, consistent, adherent to rules and requirements, and relevant. Generally, knowledge workers (i.e. those who are heavily involved in data) have an intuitive grasp of when data quality is lacking. However, pinpointing the problem should be the goal. Only if the root cause, which is generally behavioral or process-based rather than technical, of the issue is discovered can the problem be resolved. Lack of consistent data quality assurance leads to the same result with varying degrees of terribleness - decision making based on inaccurate information. For example, mismanaging company inventory is most often due to lack of data quality. Absence of data governance is all cost and no benefit. In the coming years, the threat of a lack of quality assurance will only increase as more businesses try to take advantage of data of any kind. Luckily, data governance is becoming a more well-known phenomenon. According to a survey we conducted with Censuswide, nearly 50% of companies in the financial sector have put data quality assurement as part of their overall data strategy for the coming year. Data governance prerequisites Information management used to be thought of as an enterprise-level practice. While that still rings true in many cases today, overall data load within companies has significantly risen in the past few years. With the proliferation of data-as-a-service companies and overall improvement in information acquisition, medium-size enterprises can now derive beneficial results from implementing data governance if they are within a data-heavy field. However, data governance programs will differ according to several factors. Each of these will influence the complexity of the strategy: Business model - the type of organization, its hierarchy, industry, and daily activities. Content - the volume, type (e.g. internal and external data, general information, documents, etc.) and location of content being governed. Federation - the extent and intensity of governance. Smaller businesses will barely have to think about the business model as they will usually have only one. Multinational corporations, on other hand, might have several branches and arms of action, necessitating different data governance strategies for each. However, the hardest prerequisite for data governance is proving its efficacy beforehand. Since the process itself deals with abstract concepts (e.g. data as an asset, procedural efficiency), often only platitudes of “improved performance” and “reduced operating costs” will be available as arguments. Regardless of the distinct data governance strategy implemented, the effects become visible much later down the line. Even then, for people who have an aversion to data, the effects might be nearly invisible. Therefore, while improved business performance and efficiency is a direct result of proper data governance, making the case for implementing such a strategy is easiest through risk reduction. Proper management of data results in easier compliance with laws and regulations, reduced data breach risk, and better decision making due to more streamlined access to information. “Why even bother?” Data governance is difficult, messy, and, sometimes, brutal. After all, most bad data is created out of human behavior, not technical error. That means telling people they’re doing something wrong (through habit or semi-intentional action). Proving someone wrong, at times repeatedly, is bound to ruffle some feathers. Going to a social war for data might seem like overkill. However, proper data governance prevents numerous invisible costs and opens up avenues for growth. Without it, there’s an increased likelihood of: Costs associated with data. Lack of consistent quality control can lead to the derivation of unrealistic conclusions. Noticing these has costs as retracing steps and fixing the root cause takes a considerable amount of time. Not noticing these can cause invisible financial sinks. Costs associated with opportunity. All data can deliver insight. However, messy, inaccurate, or low-quality data has its potential significantly reduced. Some insights may simply be invisible if a business can’t keep up with quality. Conclusion As data governance is associated with an improvement in nearly all aspects of the organization, its importance cannot be overstated. However, getting everyone on board and keeping them there throughout the implementation will be painful. Delivering carefully crafted cost-benefit and risk analyses of such a project will be the initial step in nearly all cases. Luckily, an end goal to all data governance programs is to disappear. As long as the required practices and behaviors remain, data quality can be maintained. Eventually, no one will even notice they’re doing something they may have considered “out of the ordinary” previously.

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Do You Know the Differences Between Business Analytics and Data Analytics?

Article | September 7, 2021

There are some fundamental differences between Business Analytics and Data Analytics, though both hold their own importance. For example, to discover patterns and observations that are ultimately used to make informed organizational decisions, Data Analytics includes analyzing datasets. On the other hand, to make realistic, data-driven business decisions, Business Analytics focuses on evaluating different kinds of information and making improvements based on those decisions. In this blog, we discuss in more detail their individual benefits and areas of expertise. Data Analytics vs. Business Analytics attracts a lot of interest from budding analysts; we will take multiple factors into account and help explain the difference between data analyst and business analyst.

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Automotive DevOps Rules of the Road Ahead

Article | September 7, 2021

DevOps will provide over-the-air (OTA), seamless software updates which would allow important and immediate updates without affecting the car’s capabilities through Liquid Software liquid software. OTA updates will enable automakers to fix engine and automotive malfunctions, as well as implement safety standards directly into the program. Tesla is one of the pioneers of over-the-air updates but while its’ cars are off. In total, Tesla’s updates are usually about 30 minutes. Since 2012, hundreds of OTA updates have been sent out by the company to adjust things like speed limit settings, acceleration, battery issues, and even braking distance. Most car manufacturers are behind when it comes to over-the-air software updates.

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Here’s How Analytics are Transforming the Marketing Industry

Article | September 7, 2021

When it comes to marketing today, big data analytics has become a powerful being. The raw material marketers need to make sense of the information they are presented with so they can do their jobs with accuracy and excellence. Big data is what empowers marketers to understand their customers based on any online action they take. Thanks to the boom of big data, marketers have learned more about new marketing trends and preferences, and behaviors of the consumer. For example, marketers know what their customers are streaming to what groceries they are ordering, thanks to big data. Data is readily available in abundance due to digital technology. Data is created through mobile phones, social media, digital ads, weblogs, electronic devices, and sensors attached through the internet of things (IoT). Data analytics helps organizations discover newer markets, learn how new customers interact with online ads, and draw conclusions and effects of new strategies. Newer sophisticated marketing analytics software and analytics tools are now being used to determine consumers’ buying patterns and key influencers in decision-making and validate data marketing approaches that yield the best results. With the integration of product management with data science, real-time data capture, and analytics, big data analytics is helping companies increase sales and improve the customer experience. In this article, we will examine how big data analytics are transforming the marketing industry. Personalized Marketing Personalized Marketing has taken an essential place in direct marketing to the consumers. Greeting consumers with their first name whenever they visit the website, sending them promotional emails of their favorite products, or notifying them with personalized recipes based on their grocery shopping are some of the examples of data-driven marketing. When marketers collect critical data marketing pieces about customers at different marketing touchpoints such as their interests, their name, what they like to listen to, what they order most, what they’d like to hear about, and who they want to hear from, this enables marketers to plan their campaigns strategically. Marketers aim for churn prevention and onboarding new customers. With customer’s marketing touchpoints, these insights can be used to improve acquisition rates, drive brand loyalty, increase revenue per customer, and improve the effectiveness of products and services. With these data marketing touchpoints, marketers can build an ideal customer profile. Furthermore, these customer profiles can help them strategize and execute personalized campaigns accordingly. Predictive Analytics Customer behavior can be traced by historical data, which is the best way to predict how customers would behave in the future. It allows companies to correctly predict which customers are interested in their products at the right time and place. Predictive analytics applies data mining, statistical techniques, machine learning, and artificial intelligence for data analysis and predict the customer’s future behavior and activities. Take an example of an online grocery store. If a customer tends to buy healthy and sugar-free snacks from the store now, they will keep buying it in the future too. This predictable behavior from the customer makes it easy for brands to capitalize on that and has been made easy by analytics tools. They can automate their sales and target the said customer. What they would be doing gives the customer chances to make “repeat purchases” based on their predictive behavior. Marketers can also suggest customers purchase products related to those repeat purchases to get them on board with new products. Customer Segmentation Customer segmentation means dividing your customers into strata to identify a specific pattern. For example, customers from a particular city may buy your products more than others, or customers from a certain age demographic prefer some products more than other age demographics. Specific marketing analytics software can help you segment your audience. For example, you can gather data like specific interests, how many times they have visited a place, unique preferences, and demographics such as age, gender, work, and home location. These insights are a golden opportunity for marketers to create bold campaigns optimizing their return on investment. They can cluster customers into specific groups and target these segments with highly relevant data marketing campaigns. The main goal of customer segmentation is to identify any interesting information that can help them increase revenue and meet their goals. Effective customer segmentation can help marketers with: • Identifying most profitable and least profitable customers • Building loyal relationships • Predicting customer patterns • Pricing products accordingly • Developing products based on their interests Businesses continue to invest in collecting high-quality data for perfect customer segmentation, which results in successful efforts. Optimized Ad Campaigns Customers’ social media data like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter makes it easier for marketers to create customized ad campaigns on a larger scale. This means that they can create specific ad campaigns for particular groups and successfully execute an ad campaign. Big data also makes it easier for marketers to run ‘remarketing’ campaigns. Remarketing campaigns ads follow your customers online, wherever they browse, once they have visited your website. Execution of an online ad campaign makes all the difference in its success. Chasing customers with paid ads can work as an effective strategy if executed well. According to the rule 7, prospective customers need to be exposed to an ad minimum of seven times before they make any move on it. When creating online ad campaigns, do keep one thing in mind. Your customers should not feel as if they are being stalked when you make any remarketing campaigns. Space out your ads and their exposure, so they appear naturally rather than coming on as pushy. Consumer Impact Advancements in data science have vastly impacted consumers. Every move they make online is saved and measured. In addition, websites now use cookies to store consumer data, so whenever these consumers visit these websites, product lists based on their shopping habits pop up on the site. Search engines and social media data enhance this. This data can be used to analyze their behavior patterns and market to them accordingly. The information gained from search engines and social media can be used to influence consumers into staying loyal and help their businesses benefit from the same. These implications can be frightening, like seeing personalized ads crop up on their Facebook page or search engine. However, when consumer data is so openly available to marketers, they need to use it wisely and safeguard it from falling into the wrong hands. Fortunately, businesses are taking note and making sure that this information remains secure. Conclusion The future of marketing because of big data and analytics seems bright and optimistic. Businesses are collecting high-quality data in real-time and analyzing it with the help of machine learning and AI; the marketing world seems to be up for massive changes. Analytics are transforming marketing industry to a different level. And with sophisticated marketers behind the wheel, the sky is the only limit. Frequently Asked Questions Why is marketing analytics so important these days? Marketing analytics helps us see how everything plays off each other, and decide how we might want to invest moving forward. Re-prioritizing how you spend your time, how you build out your team, and the resources you invest in channels and efforts are critical steps to achieving marketing team success. What is the use of marketing analytics? Marketing analytics is used to measure how well your marketing efforts are performing and to determine what can be done differently to get better results across marketing channels. Which companies use marketing analytics? Marketing analytics enables you to improve your overall marketing program performance by identifying channel deficiencies, adjusting strategies and tactics as needed, optimizing processes, etc. Companies like Netflix, Sephora, EasyJet, and Spotify use marketing analytics to improve their markeitng performance as well. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "Why is marketing analytics so important these days?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Marketing analytics helps us see how everything plays off each other, and decide how we might want to invest moving forward. Re-prioritizing how you spend your time, how you build out your team and the resources you invest in channels and efforts are critical steps to achieving marketing team success" } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What is the use of marketing analytics?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Marketing analytics is used to measure how well your marketing efforts are performing and to determine what can be done differently to get better results across marketing channels." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "Which companies use marketing analytics?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Marketing analytics enables you to improve your overall marketing program performance by identifying channel deficiencies, adjusting strategies and tactics as needed, optimizing processes, etc. Companies like Netflix, Sephora, EasyJet, and Spotify use marketing analytics to improve their markeitng performance as well." } }] }

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Spotlight

Specture Labs IoT

Specture Labs is a category-defining decision science, IOT and big data analytics company, helping enterprises systematize better data-driven decision making. Specture Labs help companies make better decisions every day. The Specture Labs Decision Engineering Methodology is a proven, methodical approach that changes the way companies leverage their data. By building quantitative analytics-based decisions and scalable solutions, our clients generate better outcome, faster every time. And see the results in their top and bottom line.

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