Heroku Explains How-to Integrate Salesforce Data into Looker #JOINData 2016

| November 29, 2016

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Overseeing all of Heroku’s Business Operations including Finance, Sales and Marketing Operations, and Analytics and Data Science, Michael provides real insight about how marketing and sales operations gurus use data to offer real-time enlightenment in any SaaS-based business.Topics covered in this presentation include: Heroku's data infrastructure architecture. Heroku's best practices in Looker- Integrating Salesforce data into Looker

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Pixentia is a technology consulting and support company dedicated to helping businesses meet their challenges. We believe technology solutions should solve problems, not create them. We provide a full range of technology services.

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BIG DATA MANAGEMENT

Exploiting IoT Data Analytics for Business Success

Article | January 21, 2021

The Internet of Things has been the hype in the past few years. It is set to play an important role in industries. Not only businesses but also consumers attempt to follow developments that come with the connected devices. Smart meters, sensors, and manufacturing equipment all can remodel the working system of companies. Based on the Statista reports, the IoT market value of 248 billion US dollars in 2020 is expected to reach a worth of 1.6 Trillion USD by 2025. The global market is in the support of IoT development and its power to bring economic growth. But, the success of IoT without the integration of data analytics is impossible. This major growth component of IoT is the blend of IoT and Big Data - together known as IoT Data Analytics. Understanding IoT Data Analytics IoT Data Analytics is the analysis of large volumes of data that has been gathered from connected devices. As IoT devices generate a lot of data even in the shortest period, it becomes complex to analyze the enormous data volumes. Besides, the IoT data is quite similar to big data but has a major difference in their size and number of sources. To overcome the difficulty in IoT data integration, IoT data analytics is the best solution. With this combination, the process of data analysis becomes cost-effective, easier, and rapid. Why Data Analytics and IoT Will Be Indispensable? Data analytics is an important part of the success of IoT investments or applications. IoT along with Data analytics will allow businesses to make efficient use of datasets. How? Let’s get into it! Impelling Revenue Using data analytics in IoT investments businesses will become able to gain insight into customer behavior. It will lead to the crafting offers and services accordingly. As a result, companies will see a hike in their profits and revenue. Volume The vast amount of data sets that are being used by IoT applications needs to be organized and analyzed to obtain patterns. It can easily be achieved by using IoT analytics software. Competitive Advantage In an era full of IoT devices and applications, the competition has also increased. You can gain a competitive advantage by hire developers that can help with the IoT analytics implementations. It will assist businesses in providing better services and stand out from the competition. Now the next question arises: Where is it being implemented? Companies like Amazon, Microsoft, Siemens, VMware, and Huawei are using IoT data analytics for product usage analysis, sensor data analysis, camera data analysis, improved equipment maintenance, and optimizing operations. The Rise of IoT Data Analytics With the help of IoT Data Analytics, companies are ready to achieve more information that can be used to improve their overall performance and revenue. Although it has not reached every corner of the market yet, it is still being used for making the workplace more efficient and safe. The ability to analyze and predict data in real-time is definitely a game-changer for companies that need all of their equipment to work efficiently all the time. It is continuously growing to provide insights that were never possible before.

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DATA SCIENCE

How Machine Learning Can Take Data Science to a Whole New Level

Article | January 21, 2021

Introduction Machine Learning (ML) has taken strides over the past few years, establishing its place in data analytics. In particular, ML has become a cornerstone in data science, alongside data wrangling, and data visualization, among other facets of the field. Yet, we observe many organizations still hesitant when allocating a budget for it in their data pipelines. The data engineer role seems to attract lots of attention, but few companies leverage the machine learning expert/engineer. Could it be that ML can add value to other enterprises too? Let's find out by clarifying certain concepts. What Machine Learning is So that we are all on the same page, let's look at a down-to-earth definition of ML that you can include in a company meeting, a report, or even within an email to a colleague who isn't in this field. Investopedia defines ML as "the concept that a computer program can learn and adapt to new data without human intervention." In other words, if your machine (be it a computer, a smartphone, or even a smart device) can learn on its own, using some specialized software, then it's under the ML umbrella. It's important to note that ML is also a stand-alone field of research, predating most AI systems, even if the two are linked, as we'll see later on. How Machine Learning is different from Statistics It's also important to note that ML is different from Statistics, even if some people like to view the former as an extension of the latter. However, there is a fundamental difference that most people aren't aware of yet. Namely, ML is data-driven while Statistics is, for the most part, model-driven. This statement means that most Stats-based inferences are made by assuming a particular distribution in the data, or the interactions of different variables, and making predictions based on our mathematical models of these distributions. ML may employ distributions in some niche cases, but for the most part, it looks at data as-is, without making any assumptions about it. Machine Learning’s role in data science work Let’s now get to the crux of the matter and explore how ML can be a significant value-add to a data science pipeline. First of all, ML can potentially offer better predictions than most Stats models in terms of accuracy, F1 score, etc. Also, ML can work alongside existing models to form model ensembles that can tackle the problems more effectively. Additionally, if transparency is important to the project stakeholders, there are ML-based options for offering some insight as to what variables are important in the data at hand, for making predictions based on it. Moreover, ML is more parametrized, meaning that you can tweak an ML model more, adapting it to the data you have and ensuring more robustness (i.e., reliability). Finally, you can learn ML without needing a Math degree or any other formal training. The latter, however, may prove useful, if you wish to delve deeper into the topic and develop your own models. This innovation potential is a significant aspect of ML since it's not as easy to develop new models in Stats (unless you are an experienced Statistics researcher) or even in AI. Besides, there are a bunch of various "heuristics" that are part of the ML group of algorithms, facilitating your data science work, regardless of what predictive model you end up using. Machine Learning and AI Many people conflate ML with AI these days. This confusion is partly because many ML models involve artificial neural networks (ANNs) which are the most modern manifestation of AI. Also, many AI systems are employed in ML tasks, so they are referred to as ML systems since AI can be a bit generic as a term. However, not all ML algorithms are AI-related, nor are all AI algorithms under the ML umbrella. This distinction is of import because certain limitations of AI systems (e.g., the need for lots and lots of data) don't apply to most ML models, while AI systems tend to be more time-consuming and resource-heavy than the average ML one. There are several ML algorithms you can use without breaking the bank and derive value from your data through them. Then, if you find that you need something better, in terms of accuracy, you can explore AI-based ones. Keep in mind, however, that some ML models (e.g., Decision Trees, Random Forests, etc.) offer some transparency, while the vast majority of AI ones are black boxes. Learning more about the topic Naturally, it's hard to do this topic justice in a single article. It is so vast that someone can write a book on it! That's what I've done earlier this year, through the Technics Publications publishing house. You can learn more about this topic via this book, which is titled Julia for Machine Learning(Julia is a modern programming language used in data science, among other fields, and it's popular among various technical professionals). Feel free to check it out and explore how you can use ML in your work. Cheers!

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Choosing External Data Sources: 4 Characteristics to Look For

Article | January 21, 2021

Decision-makers at consumer brands are finally realizing the full transformative potential of external data - but they’re also realizing how difficult it is to source. Forrester reports that 87% of decision-makers in data and analytics have implemented or are planning initiatives to source more external data. And those initiatives are growing outside of the IT team; 29% of those surveyed say that IT has primary ownership of data sourcing, down from 37% in 2016. To support these projects, organizations are increasingly turning to a new specialist: the data hunter, who identifies and vets external data sources. It’s a lot of work to build external data-focused teams, and many leaders are realizing that external data is difficult to scale as the source list grows. Perhaps that’s why 66% of those decision-makers surveyed by Forrester report that they’re using or planning to use external service providers for data, analytics, and insights.

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How big data is empowering better business intelligence

Article | January 21, 2021

Business intelligence (BI) is nothing new to enterprises that have been relying on data processing and analysis to deliver insightful reports that reflect business performance.These tools are a great match for enterprises that value the data their operations generate. BI software and programs work together to turn data into actionable insights that can drive better business decisions and market strategies and, ultimately, drive revenue as a result.Combined with the masses of external data amassing every second whether that’s customers’ feedback and experience, competitor intelligence, seasonal buying habits, or otherwise businesses can have a huge amount of data at their disposal.While BI systems draw specific data from pre-defined sources to turn them into insights, big data technologies capture data from a variety of sources in real-time, regardless of their formats or structure.

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Pixentia is a technology consulting and support company dedicated to helping businesses meet their challenges. We believe technology solutions should solve problems, not create them. We provide a full range of technology services.

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