How playing games can advance science

| September 19, 2017

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This morning, like most days, I woke up early, had a latte, turned on my computer and opened Gamasutra. Like most days, I'm looking for articles discussing how games can help advance scientific research. But this morning, for the first time, I found the article I was waiting for. A blog post by Sande Chen, featured by Gamasutra, and [re]titled.

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The global market leader for transformative legal software. We empower corporate legal and insurance departments as well as law firms succeed in delivering higher organizational value. Through rich and relevant technologies, services, solutions, and learning opportunities, clients become more productive and efficient through specialized technology solutions, find answers to complex problems through the use of deep domain-specific analytics, and cross performance barriers to breakthrough to possible.

OTHER ARTICLES

Bringing big data science to Africa

Article | March 24, 2020

Africa is set to establish its first big data hub, boosting knowledge sharing and information extraction from complex data sets.The hub will enable the continent to access and analyse timely data relating to the Sustainable Development Goals for evidence based decision making, says Oliver Chinganya, director of the Africa Statistics Centre at the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA).According to a study, big data is impacting positively in almost every sphere of life, such as in health, aviation, banking, military intelligence and space science.

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Saurav Singla, the machine learning guru, empowering society

Article | December 10, 2020

Saurav Singla is a Senior Data Scientist, a Machine Learning Expert, an Author, a Technical Writer, a Data Science Course Creator and Instructor, a Mentor, a Speaker. While Media 7 has followed Saurav Singla’s story closely, this chat with Saurav was about analytics, his journey as a data scientist, and what he brings to the table with his 15 years of extensive statistical modeling, machine learning, natural language processing, deep learning, and data analytics across Consumer Durable, Retail, Finance, Energy, Human Resource and Healthcare sectors. He has grown multiple businesses in the past and is still a researcher at heart. In the past, Analytics and Predictive Modeling is predominant in few industries but in current times becoming an eminent part of emerging fields such as health, human resource management, pharma, IoT, and other smart solutions as well. Saurav had worked in data science since 2003. Over the years, he realized that all the people they had hired — whether they are from business or engineering backgrounds — needed extensive training to be able to perform analytics on real-world business datasets. He got an opportunity to move to Australia in the year 2003. He joined a retail company Harvey Norman in Australia, working out of their Melbourne office for four years. After moving back to India, in 2008, he joined one of the verticals of Siemens — one of the few companies in India then using analytics services in-house for eight years. He is a very passionate believer that the use of data and analytics will dramatically change not only corporations but also our societies. Building and expanding the application of analytics for supply chain, logistics, sales, marketing, finance at Siemens was a very fulfilling and enjoyable experience for him. Siemens was a tremendously rewarding and enjoyable experience for him. He grew the team from zero to fifteen while he was the data scientist leader. He believes those eight years taught him how to think big, scale organizations using data science. He has demonstrated success in developing and seamlessly executing plans in complex organizational structures. He has also been recognized for maximizing performance by implementing appropriate project management tools through analysis of details to ensure quality control and understanding of emerging technology. In the year 2016, he started getting a serious inner push to start thinking about joining a consulting and shifted to a company based out in Delhi NCR. During his ten-month path with them, he improved the way clients and businesses implement and exploit machine learning in their consumer commitments. As part of that vision, he developed class-defining applications that eliminate tension technologies, processes, and humans. Another main aspect of his plan was to ensure that it was affected in very fast agile cycles. Towards that he was actively innovating on operating and engagement models. In the year 2017, he moved to London and joined a digital technology company, and assisted in building artificial intelligence and machine learning products for their clients. He aimed to solve problems and transform the costs using technology and machine learning. He was associated with them for 2 years. At the beginning of the year 2018, he joined Mindrops. He developed advanced machine learning technologies and processes to solve client problems. Mentored the Data Science function and guide them in the development of the solution. He built robust clients Data Science capabilities which can be scalable across multiple business use cases. Outside work, Saurav associated with Mentoring Club and Revive. He volunteers in his spare time for helping, coaching, and mentoring young people in taking up careers in the data science domain, data practitioners to build high-performing teams and grow the industry. He assists data science enthusiasts to stay motivated and guide them along their career path. He helps fill the knowledge gap and help aspirants understand the core of the industry. He helps aspirants analyze their progress and help them upskill accordingly. He also helps them connect with potential job opportunities with their industry-leading network. Additionally, in the year 2018, he joined as a mentor in the Transaction Behavioral Intelligence company that accelerates business growth for banks with the use of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning enabled products. He is guiding their machine learning engineers with their projects. He is enhancing the capabilities of their AI-driven recommendation engine product. Saurav is teaching the learners to grasp data science knowledge more engaging way by providing courses on the Udemy marketplace. He has created two courses on Udemy, with over twenty thousand students enrolled in it. He regularly speaks at meetups on data science topics and writes articles on data science topics in major publications such as AI Time Journal, Towards Data Science, Data Science Central, Kdnuggets, Data-Driven Investor, HackerNoon, and Infotech Report. He actively contributes academic research papers in machine learning, deep learning, natural language processing, statistics and artificial intelligence. His book on Machine Learning for Finance was published by BPB Publications which is Asia's largest publisher of Computer and IT Books. This is possibly one of the biggest milestones of his career. Saurav turned his passion to make knowledge available for society. Saurav believes sharing knowledge is cool, and he wishes everyone should have that passion for knowledge sharing. That would be his success.

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Splunk Big Data Big Opportunity

Article | March 21, 2020

Splunk extracts insights from big data. It is growing rapidly, it has a large total addressable market, and it has tremendous momentum from its exposure to industry megatrends (i.e. the cloud, big data, the "internet of things," and security). Further, its strategy of continuous innovation is being validated as the company wins very large deals. Investors should not be distracted by a temporary slowdown in revenue growth, as the company has wisely transitioned to a subscription model. This article reviews the business, its strategy, valuation the sell-off is overdone and risks. We conclude with our thoughts on investing.

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Data Analytics Convergence: Business Intelligence(BI) Meets Machine Learning (ML)

Article | July 29, 2020

Headquartered in London, England, BP (NYSE: BP) is a multinational oil and gas company. Operating since 1909, the organization offers its customers with fuel for transportation, energy for heat and light, lubricants to keep engines moving, and the petrochemicals products. Business intelligence has always been a key enabler for improving decision making processes in large enterprises from early days of spreadsheet software to building enterprise data warehouses for housing large sets of enterprise data and to more recent developments of mining those datasets to unearth hidden relationships. One underlying theme throughout this evolution has been the delegation of crucial task of finding out the remarkable relationships between various objects of interest to human beings. What BI technology has been doing, in other words, is to make it possible (and often easy too) to find the needle in the proverbial haystack if you somehow know in which sectors of the barn it is likely to be. It is a validatory as opposed to a predictory technology. When the amount of data is huge in terms of variety, amount, and dimensionality (a.k.a. Big Data) and/or the relationship between datasets are beyond first-order linear relationships amicable to human intuition, the above strategy of relying solely on humans to make essential thinking about the datasets and utilizing machines only for crucial but dumb data infrastructure tasks becomes totally inadequate. The remedy to the problem follows directly from our characterization of it: finding ways to utilize the machines beyond menial tasks and offloading some or most of cognitive work from humans to the machines. Does this mean all the technology and associated practices developed over the decades in BI space are not useful anymore in Big Data age? Not at all. On the contrary, they are more useful than ever: whereas in the past humans were in the driving seat and controlling the demand for the use of the datasets acquired and curated diligently, we have now machines taking up that important role and hence unleashing manifold different ways of using the data and finding out obscure, non-intuitive relationships that allude humans. Moreover, machines can bring unprecedented speed and processing scalability to the game that would be either prohibitively expensive or outright impossible to do with human workforce. Companies have to realize both the enormous potential of using new automated, predictive analytics technologies such as machine learning and how to successfully incorporate and utilize those advanced technologies into the data analysis and processing fabric of their existing infrastructure. It is this marrying of relatively old, stable technologies of data mining, data warehousing, enterprise data models, etc. with the new automated predictive technologies that has the huge potential to unleash the benefits so often being hyped by the vested interests of new tools and applications as the answer to all data analytical problems. To see this in the context of predictive analytics, let's consider the machine learning(ML) technology. The easiest way to understand machine learning would be to look at the simplest ML algorithm: linear regression. ML technology will build on basic interpolation idea of the regression and extend it using sophisticated mathematical techniques that would not necessarily be obvious to the causal users. For example, some ML algorithms would extend linear regression approach to model non-linear (i.e. higher order) relationships between dependent and independent variables in the dataset via clever mathematical transformations (a.k.a kernel methods) that will express those non-linear relationship in a linear form and hence suitable to be run through a linear algorithm. Be it a simple linear algorithm or its more sophisticated kernel methods variation, ML algorithms will not have any context on the data they process. This is both a strength and weakness at the same time. Strength because the same algorithms could process a variety of different kinds of data, allowing us to leverage all the work gone through the development of those algorithms in different business contexts, weakness because since the algorithms lack any contextual understanding of the data, perennial computer science truth of garbage in, garbage out manifests itself unceremoniously here : ML models have to be fed "right" kind of data to draw out correct insights that explain the inner relationships in the data being processed. ML technology provides an impressive set of sophisticated data analysis and modelling algorithms that could find out very intricate relationships among the datasets they process. It provides not only very sophisticated, advanced data analysis and modeling methods but also the ability to use these methods in an automated, hence massively distributed and scalable ways. Its Achilles' heel however is its heavy dependence on the data it is being fed with. Best analytic methods would be useless, as far as drawing out useful insights from them are concerned, if they are applied on the wrong kind of data. More seriously, the use of advanced analytical technology could give a false sense of confidence to their users over the analysis results those methods produce, making the whole undertaking not just useless but actually dangerous. We can address the fundamental weakness of ML technology by deploying its advanced, raw algorithmic processing capabilities in conjunction with the existing data analytics technology whereby contextual data relationships and key domain knowledge coming from existing BI estate (data mining efforts, data warehouses, enterprise data models, business rules, etc.) are used to feed ML analytics pipeline. This approach will combine superior algorithmic processing capabilities of the new ML technology with the enterprise knowledge accumulated through BI efforts and will allow companies build on their existing data analytics investments while transitioning to use incoming advanced technologies. This, I believe, is effectively a win-win situation and will be key to the success of any company involved in data analytics efforts.

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Wolters Kluwer ELM Solutions

The global market leader for transformative legal software. We empower corporate legal and insurance departments as well as law firms succeed in delivering higher organizational value. Through rich and relevant technologies, services, solutions, and learning opportunities, clients become more productive and efficient through specialized technology solutions, find answers to complex problems through the use of deep domain-specific analytics, and cross performance barriers to breakthrough to possible.

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