PMP: 5 Questions with GroupM's Chief Trading Officer

| May 31, 2016

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Today, we posted our second piece in a series about private marketplaces in Canada for Marketing Magazine. In our last piece, John Rogers discussed why we’re seeing such fast growth of PMPs in Canada and how this model can be applied to programmatic TV.

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Technologent

Technologent is a Global Provider of Edge-to-Edge℠ Information Technology Solutions and Services for Fortune 1000 and SMB companies. We offer a unique blend of business practices that are aligned to solve for top CIO concerns. Our core competencies focus on data center infrastructure, business continuity, data protection, service automation and orchestration, continuous intelligence, monitoring, connectivity, collaboration and cybersecurity. These practices are supported by our professional services, managed services and financial services offerings.

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CAN QUANTUM COMPUTING BE THE NEW BUZZWORD

Article | March 30, 2020

Quantum Mechanics created their chapter in the history of the early 20th Century. With its regular binary computing twin going out of style, quantum mechanics led quantum computing to be the new belle of the ball! While the memory used in a classical computer encodes binary ‘bits’ – one and zero, quantum computers use qubits (quantum bits). And Qubit is not confined to a two-state solution, but can also exist in superposition i.e., qubits can be employed at 0, 1 and both 1 and 0 at the same time.

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Top 6 Marketing Analytics Trends in 2021

Article | March 30, 2020

The marketing industry keeps changing every year. Businesses and enterprises have the task of keeping up with the changes in marketing trends as they evolve. As consumer demands and behavior changed, brands had to move from traditional marketing channels like print and electronic to digital channels like social media, Google Ads, YouTube, and more. Businesses have begun to consider marketing analytics a crucial component of marketing as they are the primary reason for success. In uncertain times, marketing analytics tools calculate and evaluate the market status and enhances better planning for enterprises. As Covid-19 hit the world, organizations that used traditional marketing analytics tools and relied on historical data realized that many of these models became irrelevant. The pandemic rendered a lot of data useless. With machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) in marketers’ arsenal, marketing analytics is turning virtual with a shift in the marketing landscape in 2021. They are also pivoting from relying on just AI technologies but rather combining big data with it. AI and machine learning help advertisers and marketers to improve their target audience and re-strategize their campaigns through advanced marketing attributes, which in turn increases customer retention and customer loyalty. While technology is making targeting and measuring possible, marketers have had to reassure their commitment to consumer privacy and data regulations and governance in their initiatives. They are also relying on third-party data. These data and analytics trends will help organizations deal with radical changes and uncertainties, with opportunities they bring with them over the next few years. To know why businesses are gravitating towards these trends in marketing analytics, let us look at why it is so important. Importance of Marketing Analytics As businesses extended into new marketing categories, new technologies were implemented to support them. This new technology was usually deployed in isolation, which resulted in assorted and disconnected data sets. Usually, marketers based their decisions on data from individual channels like website metrics, not considering other marketers channels. Website and social media metrics alone are not enough. In contrast, marketing analytics tools look at all marketing done across channels over a period of time that is vital for sound decision-making and effective program execution. Marketing analytics helps understand how well a campaign is working to achieve business goals or key performance indicators. Marketing analytics allows you to answer questions like: • How are your marketing initiatives/ campaigns working? What can be done to improve them? • How do your marketing campaigns compare with others? What are they spending their time and money on? What marketing analytics software are they using that helps them? • What should be your next step? How should you allocate the marketing budget according to your current spending? Now that the advantages of marketing analytics are clear, let us get into the details of the trends in marketing analytics of 2021: Rise of real-time marketing data analytics Reciprocation to any action is the biggest trend right now in digital marketing, especially post Covid. Brands and businesses strive to respond to customer queries and provide them with solutions. Running queries in a low-latency customer data platform have allowed marketers to filter the view by the audience and identify underachieving sectors. Once this data is collected, businesses and brands can then readjust their customer targeting and messaging to optimize their performance. To achieve this on a larger scale, organizations need to invest in marketing analytics software and platforms to balance data loads with processing for business intelligence and analytics. The platform needs to allow different types of jobs to run parallel by adding resources to groups as required. This gives data scientists more flexibility and access to response data at any given time. Real-time analytics will also aid marketers in identifying underlying threats and problems in their strategies. Marketers will have to conduct a SWOT analysis and continuously optimize their campaigns to suit them better. . Data security, regulatory compliance, and protecting consumer privacy Protecting market data from a rise in cybercrimes and breaches are crucial problems to be addressed in 2021. This year has seen a surge in data breaches that have damaged businesses and their infrastructures to different levels. As a result, marketers have increased their investments in encryption, access control, network monitoring, and other security measures. To help comply with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) of the European Union, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), and other regulatory bodies, organizations have made the shift to platforms where all consumer data is in one place. Advanced encryptions and stateless computing have made it possible to securely store and share governed data that can be kept in a single location. Interacting with a single copy of the same data will help compliance officers tasked with identifying and deleting every piece of information related to a particular customer much easier and the possibility of overseeing something gets canceled. Protecting consumer privacy is imperative for marketers. They offer consumers the control to opt out, eradicate their data once they have left the platform, and remove information like location, access control to personally identifiable information like email addresses and billing details separated from other marketing data. Predictive analytics Predictive analytics’ analyzes collected data and predicts future outcomes through ML and AI. It maps out a lookalike audience and identifies which strata are most likely to become a high-value customer and which customer strata has the highest likelihood of churn. It also gauges people’s interests based on their browsing history. With better ML models, predictions have become better overtime, leading to increased customer retention and a drop in churn. According to the research by Zion Market Research, by 2022, the global market for predictive analytics is set to hit $11 billion. Investment in first-party data Cookies-enabled website tracking led marketers to know who was visiting their website and re-calibrate their ads to these people throughout the web. However, in 2020, Google announced cookies would be phased out of Chrome within two years while they had already removed them from Safari and Firefox. Now that adding low-friction tracking to web pages will be tough, marketers will have to gather more limited data. This will then be then integrated with first-party data sets to get a rounded view of the customer. Although a big win for consumer privacy activists, it is difficult for advertisers and agencies to find it more difficult to retarget ads and build audiences in their data management platforms. In a digital world without cookies, marketers now understand how customer data is collected, introspect on their marketing models, and evaluate their marketing strategy. Emergence of contextual customer experience These trends in marketing analytics have become more contextually conscious since the denunciation of cookies. Since marketers are losing their data sets and behavioral data, they have an added motivation to invest in insights. This means that marketers have to target messaging based on known and inferred customer characteristics like their age, location, income, brand affinity, and where these customers are in their buying journey. For example, marketers should tailor messaging in ads to make up consumers based on the frequency of their visits to the store. Effective contextual targeting hinges upon marketers using a single platform for their data and creates a holistic customer profile. Reliance on third-party data Even though there has been a drop in third-party data collection, marketers will continue to invest in third-party data which have a complete understanding of their customers that augments the first-party data they have. Historically, third-party data has been difficult to source and maintain for marketers. There are new platforms that counter improvement of data like long time to value, cost of maintaining third-party data pipelines, and data governance problems. U.S. marketers have spent upwards of $11.9 billion on third-party audience data in 2019, up 6.1% from 2018, and this reported growth curve is going to be even steeper in 2021, according to a study by Interactive Advertising Bureau and Winterberry Group. Conclusion Marketing analytics enables more successful marketing as it shows off direct results of the marketing efforts and investments. These new marketing data analytics trends have made their definite mark and are set to make this year interesting with data and AI-based applications mixed with the changing landscape of marketing channels. Digital marketing will be in demand more than ever as people are purchasing more online. Frequently Asked Questions Why is marketing analytics so important? Marketing analytics has two main purposes; to gauge how well your marketing efforts perform and measure the effectiveness of marketing activity. What is the use of marketing analytics? Marketing analytics help us understand how everything plays off of each other and decide how to invest, whether to re-prioritize or keep going with the current methods. Which industries use marketing analytics? Commercial organizations use it to analyze data from different sources, use analytics to determine the success of a marketing campaign, and target customers specifically. What are the types of marketing analytics tools? Some marketing analytics’ tools are Google Analytics, HubSpot Marketing Hub, Semrush, Looker, Optimizely, etc. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "Why is marketing analytics so important?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Marketing analytics has two main purposes; to gauge how well your marketing efforts perform and measure the effectiveness of marketing activity." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What is the use of marketing analytics?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Marketing analytics help us understand how everything plays off of each other and decide how to invest, whether to re-prioritize or keep going with the current methods." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "Which industries use marketing analytics?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Commercial organizations use it to analyze data from different sources, use analytics to determine the success of a marketing campaign, and target customers specifically." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are the types of marketing analytics tools?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Some marketing analytics’ tools are Google Analytics, HubSpot Marketing Hub, Semrush, Looker, Optimizely, etc." } }] }

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Will We Be Able to Use AI to Prevent Further Pandemics?

Article | March 30, 2020

For many, 2021 has brought hope that they can cautiously start to prepare for a world after Covid. That includes living with the possibility of future pandemics, and starting to reflect on what has been learned from such a brutal shared experience. One of the areas that has come into its own during Covid has been artificial intelligence (AI), a technology that helped bring the pandemic under control, and allow life to continue through lockdowns and other disruptions. Plenty has been written about how AI has supported many aspects of life at work and home during Covid, from videoconferencing to online food ordering. But the role of AI in preventing Covid causing even more havoc is not necessarily as widely known. Perhaps even more importantly, little has been said about the role AI is likely to play in preparing for, responding to and even preventing future pandemics. From what we saw in 2020, AI will help prevent global outbreaks of new diseases in three ways: prediction, diagnosis and treatment. Prediction Predicting pandemics is all about tracking data that could be possible early signs that a new disease is spreading in a disturbing way. The kind of data we’re talking about includes public health information about symptoms presenting to hospitals and doctors around the world. There is already plenty of this captured in healthcare systems globally, and is consolidated into datasets such as the Johns Hopkins reports that many of us are familiar with from news briefings. Firms like Bluedot and Metabiota are part of a growing number of organisations which use AI to track both publicly available and private data and make relevant predictions about public health threats. Both of these received attention in 2020 by reporting the appearance of Covid before it had been officially acknowledged. Boston Children’s Hospital is an example of a healthcare institution doing something similar with their Healthmap resource. In addition to conventional healthcare data, AI is uniquely able to make use of informal data sources such as social media, news aggregators and discussion forums. This is because of AI techniques such as natural language processing and sentiment analysis. Firms such as Stratifyd use AI to do this in other business settings such as marketing, but also talk publicly about the use of their platform to predict and prevent pandemics. This is an example of so-called augmented intelligence, where AI is used to guide people to noteworthy data patterns, but stops short of deciding what it means, leaving that to human judgement. Another important part of preventing a pandemic is keeping track of the transmission of disease through populations and geographies. A significant issue in 2020 was difficulty tracing people who had come into contact with infection. There was some success using mobile phones for this, and AI was critical in generating useful knowledge from mobile phone data. The emphasis of Covid tracing apps in 2020 was keeping track of how the disease had already spread, but future developments are likely to be about predicting future spread patterns from such data. Prediction is a strength of AI, and the principles used to great effect in weather forecasting are similar to those used to model likely pandemic spread. Diagnosis To prevent future pandemics, it won’t be enough to predict when a disease is spreading rapidly. To make the most of this knowledge, it’s necessary to diagnose and treat cases. One of the greatest early challenges with Covid was the lack of speedy, reliable tests. For future pandemics, AI is likely to be used to create such tests more quickly than was the case in 2020. Creating a useful test involves modelling a disease’s response to different testing reagents, finding right balance between speed, convenience and accuracy. AI modelling simulates in a computer how individual cells respond to different stimuli, and could be used to perform virtual testing of many different types of test to accelerate how quickly the most promising ones reach laboratory and field trials. In 2020 there were also several novel uses of AI to diagnose Covid, but there were few national and global mechanisms to deploy these at scale. One example was the use of AI imaging, diagnosing Covid by analysing chest x-rays for features specific to Covid. This would have been especially valuable in places that didn’t have access to lab testing equipment. Another example was using AI to analyse the sound of coughs to identify unique characteristics of a Covid cough. AI research to systematically investigate innovative diagnosis techniques such as these should result in better planning for alternatives to laboratory testing. Faster and wider rollout of this kind of diagnosis would help control spread of a future disease during the critical period waiting for other tests to be developed or shared. This would be another contribution of AI to preventing a localised outbreak becoming a pandemic. Treatment Historically, vaccination has proven to be an effective tool for dealing with pandemics, and was the long term solution to Covid for most countries. AI was used to accelerate development of Covid vaccines, helping cut the development time from years or decades to months. In principle, the use of AI was similar to that described above for developing diagnostic tests. Different drug development teams used AI in different ways, but they all relied on mathematical modelling of how the Covid virus would respond to many forms of treatment at a microscopic level. Much of the vaccine research and modelling focused on the “spike” proteins that allow Covid to attack human cells and enter the body. These are also found in other viruses, and were already the subject of research before the 2020 pandemic. That research allowed scientists to quickly develop AI models to represent the spikes, and simulate the effects of different possible treatments. This was crucial in trialling thousands of possible treatments in computer models, pinpointing the most likely successes for further investigation. This kind of mathematical simulation using AI continued during drug development, and moved substantial amounts of work from the laboratory to the computer. This modelling also allowed the impact of Covid mutations on vaccines to be assessed quickly. It is why scientists were reasonably confident of developing variants of vaccines for new Covid mutations in days and weeks rather than months. As a result of the global effort to develop Covid vaccines, the body of data and knowledge about virus behaviour has grown substantially. This means it should be possible to understand new pathogens even more rapidly than Covid, potentially in hours or days rather than weeks. AI has also helped create new ways of approaching vaccine development, for example the use of pre-prepared generic vaccines designed to treat viruses from the same family as Covid. Modifying one of these to the specific features of a new virus is much faster than starting from scratch, and AI may even have already simulated exactly such a variation. AI has been involved in many parts of the fight against Covid, and we now have a much better idea than in 2020 of how to predict, diagnose and treat pandemics, especially similar viruses to Covid. So we can be cautiously optimistic that vaccine development for any future Covid-like viruses will be possible before it becomes a pandemic. Perhaps a trickier question is how well we will be able to respond if the next pandemic is from a virus that is nothing like Covid. Was Rahman is an expert in the ethics of artificial intelligence, the CEO of AI Prescience and the author of AI and Machine Learning. See more at www.wasrahman.com

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BIG DATA MANAGEMENT

How can machine learning detect money laundering?

Article | March 30, 2020

In this article, we will explore different techniques to detect money laundering activities. Notwithstanding, regardless of various expected applications inside the financial services sector, explicitly inside the Anti-Money Laundering (AML) appropriation of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning (ML) has been generally moderate. What is Money Laundering, Anti Money Laundering? Money Laundering is where someone unlawfully obtains money and moves it to cover up their crimes. Anti-Money Laundering can be characterized as an activity that forestalls or aims to forestall money laundering from occurring. It is assessed by UNO that, money-laundering exchanges account in one year is 2–5% of worldwide GDP or $800 billion — $3 trillion in USD. In 2019, regulators and governmental offices exacted fines of more than $8.14 billion. Indeed, even with these stunning numbers, gauges are that just about 1 % of unlawful worldwide money related streams are ever seized by the specialists. AML activities in banks expend an over the top measure of manpower, assets, and cash flow to deal with the process and comply with the guidelines. What are the punishments for money laundering? In 2019, Celent evaluated that spending came to $8.3 billion and $23.4 billion for technology and operations, individually. This speculation is designated toward guaranteeing anti-money laundering. As we have seen much of the time, reputational costs can likewise convey a hefty price. In 2012, HSBC laundering of an expected £5.57 billion over at least seven years.   What is the current situation of the banks applying ML to stop money laundering? Given the plenty of new instruments the banks have accessible, the potential feature risk, the measure of capital involved, and the gigantic expenses as a form of fines and punishments, this should not be the situation. A solid impact by nations to curb illicit cash movement has brought about a huge yet amazingly little part of money laundering being recognized — a triumph rate of about 2% average. Dutch banks — ABN Amro, Rabobank, ING, Triodos Bank, and Volksbank announced in September 2019 to work toward a joint transaction monitoring to stand-up fight against Money Laundering. A typical challenge in transaction monitoring, for instance, is the generation of a countless number of alerts, which thusly requires operation teams to triage and process the alarms. ML models can identify and perceive dubious conduct and besides they can classify alerts into different classes such as critical, high, medium, or low risk. Critical or High alerts may be directed to senior experts on a high need to quickly explore the issue. Today is the immense number of false positives, gauges show that the normal, of false positives being produced, is the range of 95 and 99%, and this puts extraordinary weight on banks. The examination of false positives is tedious and costs money. An ongoing report found that banks were spending near 3.01€ billion every year exploring false positives. Establishments are looking for increasing productive ways to deal with crime and, in this specific situation, Machine Learning can end up being a significant tool. Financial activities become productive, the gigantic sum and speed of money related exchanges require a viable monitoring framework that can process exchanges rapidly, ideally in real-time.   What are the types of machine learning algorithms which can identify money laundering transactions? Supervised Machine Learning, it is essential to have historical information with events precisely assigned and input variables appropriately captured. If biases or errors are left in the data without being dealt with, they will get passed on to the model, bringing about erroneous models. It is smarter to utilize Unsupervised Machine Learning to have historical data with events accurately assigned. It sees an obscure pattern and results. It recognizes suspicious activity without earlier information of exactly what a money-laundering scheme resembles. What are the different techniques to detect money laundering? K-means Sequence Miner algorithm: Entering banking transactions, at that point running frequent pattern mining algorithms and mining transactions to distinguish money laundering. Clustering transactions and dubious activities to money laundering lastly show them on a chart. Time Series Euclidean distance: Presenting a sequence matching algorithm to distinguish money laundering detection, utilizing sequential detection of suspicious transactions. This method exploits the two references to recognize dubious transactions: a history of every individual’s account and exchange data with different accounts. Bayesian networks: It makes a model of the user’s previous activities, and this model will be a measure of future customer activities. In the event that the exchange or user financial transactions have. Cluster-based local outlier factor algorithm: The money laundering detection utilizing clustering techniques combination and Outliers.   Conclusion For banks, now is the ideal opportunity to deploy ML models into their ecosystem. Despite this opportunity, increased knowledge and the number of ML implementations prompted a discussion about the feasibility of these solutions and the degree to which ML should be trusted and potentially replace human analysis and decision-making. In order to further exploit and achieve ML promise, banks need to continue to expand on its awareness of ML strengths, risks, and limitations and, most critically, to create an ethical system by which the production and use of ML can be controlled and the feasibility and effect of these emerging models proven and eventually trusted.

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Technologent

Technologent is a Global Provider of Edge-to-Edge℠ Information Technology Solutions and Services for Fortune 1000 and SMB companies. We offer a unique blend of business practices that are aligned to solve for top CIO concerns. Our core competencies focus on data center infrastructure, business continuity, data protection, service automation and orchestration, continuous intelligence, monitoring, connectivity, collaboration and cybersecurity. These practices are supported by our professional services, managed services and financial services offerings.

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