Solving Business Issues with Data Science. Learn from this Insurance Use Case

| June 13, 2018

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Data science is a priority for your businesses, and data science teams are under more pressure than ever to deliver ROI. What does it look like to deliver business value? Watch this example of how a data science team can help multiple departments prepare for an upcoming storm, reducing the financial and operational impact on the company. IBM’s Irina Saburova and Rosie Pongracz will take you through a demonstration of how the Finance, Operations and Fraud departments benefit from the use of a diverse set of tools and techniques.

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Data Collective

Data Collective is a VC fund that makes venture capital investments in data scientists and entrepreneurs working on hard big data problems

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Predictive analytics vs AI Why the difference matters

Article | February 10, 2020

There are few movie scenes I can recall from my childhood, but I vividly remember seeing the 1968 Stanley Kubrick sci-fi movie 2001 A Space Odyssey in 1970 with my older cousin. What stays with me to this day is the scene where astronaut Dave asks HAL, the homicidal computer based on artificial intelligence (AI), to open the pod bay doors. HAL's eerie reply: I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.In that moment, the concept of man vs. machine was created, predicated on the idea that machines created by man and using AI could (eventually) defy orders, position themselves in the vanguard, and overthrow humankind. Fast forward to today. Within the information governance space, there are two terms that have been used quite frequently in recent years analytics and AI. Often they are used interchangeably and are practically synonymous.

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How can we democratize machine learning on IoT devices

Article | February 12, 2020

TinyML, as a concept, concerns the running of ML inference on Ultra Low-Power (ULP 1mW) microcontrollers found on IoT devices. Yet today, various challenges still limit the effective execution of TinyML in the embedded IoT world. As both a concept and community, it is still under development.Here at Ericsson, the focus of our TinyML as-a-Service (TinyMLaaS) activity is to democratize TinyML, enabling manufacturers to start their AI businesses using TinyML, which runs on 8, 16 and 32 bit microcontrollers.Our goal is to make the execution of ML tasks possible and easy in a specific class of devices. These devices are characterized by very constrained hardware and software resources such as sensor and actuator nodes based on these microcontrollers.Below, we present how we can bind the as-a-service model to TinyML. We will provide a high-level technical overview of our concept and introduce the design requirements and building blocks which characterize this emerging paradigm.

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AI and Predictive Analytics: Myth, Math, or Magic

Article | February 10, 2020

We are a species invested in predicting the future as if our lives depended on it. Indeed, good predictions of where wolves might lurk were once a matter of survival. Even as civilization made us physically safer, prediction has remained a mainstay of culture, from the haruspices of ancient Rome inspecting animal entrails to business analysts dissecting a wealth of transactions to foretell future sales. With these caveats in mind, I predict that in 2020 (and the decade ahead) we will struggle if we unquestioningly adopt artificial intelligence (AI) in predictive analytics, founded on an unjustified overconfidence in the almost mythical power of AI's mathematical foundations. This is another form of the disease of technochauvinism I discussed in a previous article.

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Taking a qualitative approach to a data-driven market

Article | February 18, 2021

While digital transformation is proving to have many benefits for businesses, what is perhaps the most significant, is the vast amount of data there is available. And now, with an increasing number of businesses turning their focus to online, there is even more to be collected on competitors and markets than ever before. Having all this information to hand may seem like any business owner’s dream, as they can now make insightful and informed commercial decisions based on what others are doing, what customers want and where markets are heading. But according to Nate Burke, CEO of Diginius, a propriety software and solutions provider for ecommerce businesses, data should not be all a company relies upon when making important decisions. Instead, there is a line to be drawn on where data is required and where human expertise and judgement can provide greater value. Undeniably, the power of data is unmatched. With an abundance of data collection opportunities available online, and with an increasing number of businesses taking them, the potential and value of such information is richer than ever before. And businesses are benefiting. Particularly where data concerns customer behaviour and market patterns. For instance, over the recent Christmas period, data was clearly suggesting a preference for ecommerce, with marketplaces such as Amazon leading the way due to greater convenience and price advantages. Businesses that recognised and understood the trend could better prepare for the digital shopping season, placing greater emphasis on their online marketing tactics to encourage purchases and allocating resources to ensure product availability and on-time delivery. While on the other hand, businesses who ignored, or simply did not utilise the information available to them, would have been left with overstocked shops and now, out of season items that would have to be heavily discounted or worse, disposed of. Similarly, search and sales data can be used to understand changing consumer needs, and consequently, what items businesses should be ordering, manufacturing, marketing and selling for the best returns. For instance, understandably, in 2020, DIY was at its peak, with increases in searches for “DIY facemasks”, “DIY decking” and “DIY garden ideas”. For those who had recognised the trend early on, they had the chance to shift their offerings and marketing in accordance, in turn really reaping the rewards. So, paying attention to data certainly does pay off. And thanks to smarter and more sophisticated ways of collecting data online, such as cookies, and through AI and machine learning technologies, the value and use of such information is only likely to increase. The future, therefore, looks bright. But even with all this potential at our fingertips, there are a number of issues businesses may face if their approach relies entirely on a data and insight-driven approach. Just like disregarding its power and potential can be damaging, so can using it as the sole basis upon which important decisions are based. Human error While the value of data for understanding the market and consumer patterns is undeniable, its value is only as rich as the quality of data being inputted. So, if businesses are collecting and analysing their data on their own activity, and then using this to draw meaningful insight, there should be strong focus on the data gathering phase, with attention given to what needs to be collected, why it should be collected, how it will be collected, and whether in fact this is an accurate representation of what it is you are trying to monitor or measure. Human error can become an issue when this is done by individuals or teams who do not completely understand the numbers and patterns they are seeing. There is also an obstacle presented when there are various channels and platforms which are generating leads or sales for the business. In this case, any omission can skew results and provide an inaccurate picture. So, when used in decision making, there is the possibility of ineffective and unsuccessful changes. But while data gathering becomes more and more autonomous, the possibility of human error is lessened. Although, this may add fuel to the next issue. Drawing a line The benefits of data and insights are clear, particularly as the tasks of collection and analysis become less of a burden for businesses and their people thanks to automation and AI advancements. But due to how effortless data collection and analysis is becoming, we can only expect more businesses to be doing it, meaning its ability to offer each individual company something unique is also being lessened. So, businesses need to look elsewhere for their edge. And interestingly, this is where a line should be drawn and human judgement should be used in order to set them apart from the competition and differentiate from what everyone else is doing. It makes perfect sense when you think about it. Your business is unique for a number of reasons, but mainly because of the brand, its values, reputation and perceptions of the services you are upheld by. And it’s usually these aspects that encourage consumers to choose your business rather than a competitor. But often, these intangible aspects are much more difficult to measure and monitor through data collection and analysis, especially in the autonomous, number-driven format that many platforms utilise. Here then, there is a great case for businesses to use their own judgements, expertise and experiences to determine what works well and what does not. For instance, you can begin to determine consumer perceptions towards a change in your product or services, which quantitative data may not be able to pick up until much later when sales figures begin to rise or fall. And while the data will eventually pick it up, it might not necessarily be able to help you decide on what an appropriate alternative solution may be, should the latter occur. Human judgement, however, can listen to and understand qualitative feedback and consumer sentiments which can often provide much more meaningful insights for businesses to base their decisions on. So, when it comes to competitor analysis, using insights generated from figure-based data sets and performance metrics is key to ensuring you are doing the same as the competition. But if you are looking to get ahead, you may want to consider taking a human approach too.

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Data Collective is a VC fund that makes venture capital investments in data scientists and entrepreneurs working on hard big data problems

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