Standards in Predictive Analytics

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Standards play a central role in creating an ecosystem that supports current and future needs for broad, real-time use of predictive analytics in an era of Big Data. Just a few years ago it was common to develop a predictive analytic model using a single proprietary tool against a sample of structured data. This would then be applied in batch, storing scores for future use in a database or data warehouse. Recently this model has been disrupted

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Maprisk is a specialty data aggregator delivering location intelligence to the property & casualty insurance vertical. Talk to us at info@maprisk.com. We deliver actionable underwriting and natural hazard data via RESTful API or our custom platform. Let us help you minimize keystrokes for your distributors and maximize profits for your underwriters. Currently used by over 100 leading Insurance carrier / MGA's and 5,000+ retail agency users.

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DATA SCIENCE

How Machine Learning Can Take Data Science to a Whole New Level

Article | December 21, 2020

Introduction Machine Learning (ML) has taken strides over the past few years, establishing its place in data analytics. In particular, ML has become a cornerstone in data science, alongside data wrangling, and data visualization, among other facets of the field. Yet, we observe many organizations still hesitant when allocating a budget for it in their data pipelines. The data engineer role seems to attract lots of attention, but few companies leverage the machine learning expert/engineer. Could it be that ML can add value to other enterprises too? Let's find out by clarifying certain concepts. What Machine Learning is So that we are all on the same page, let's look at a down-to-earth definition of ML that you can include in a company meeting, a report, or even within an email to a colleague who isn't in this field. Investopedia defines ML as "the concept that a computer program can learn and adapt to new data without human intervention." In other words, if your machine (be it a computer, a smartphone, or even a smart device) can learn on its own, using some specialized software, then it's under the ML umbrella. It's important to note that ML is also a stand-alone field of research, predating most AI systems, even if the two are linked, as we'll see later on. How Machine Learning is different from Statistics It's also important to note that ML is different from Statistics, even if some people like to view the former as an extension of the latter. However, there is a fundamental difference that most people aren't aware of yet. Namely, ML is data-driven while Statistics is, for the most part, model-driven. This statement means that most Stats-based inferences are made by assuming a particular distribution in the data, or the interactions of different variables, and making predictions based on our mathematical models of these distributions. ML may employ distributions in some niche cases, but for the most part, it looks at data as-is, without making any assumptions about it. Machine Learning’s role in data science work Let’s now get to the crux of the matter and explore how ML can be a significant value-add to a data science pipeline. First of all, ML can potentially offer better predictions than most Stats models in terms of accuracy, F1 score, etc. Also, ML can work alongside existing models to form model ensembles that can tackle the problems more effectively. Additionally, if transparency is important to the project stakeholders, there are ML-based options for offering some insight as to what variables are important in the data at hand, for making predictions based on it. Moreover, ML is more parametrized, meaning that you can tweak an ML model more, adapting it to the data you have and ensuring more robustness (i.e., reliability). Finally, you can learn ML without needing a Math degree or any other formal training. The latter, however, may prove useful, if you wish to delve deeper into the topic and develop your own models. This innovation potential is a significant aspect of ML since it's not as easy to develop new models in Stats (unless you are an experienced Statistics researcher) or even in AI. Besides, there are a bunch of various "heuristics" that are part of the ML group of algorithms, facilitating your data science work, regardless of what predictive model you end up using. Machine Learning and AI Many people conflate ML with AI these days. This confusion is partly because many ML models involve artificial neural networks (ANNs) which are the most modern manifestation of AI. Also, many AI systems are employed in ML tasks, so they are referred to as ML systems since AI can be a bit generic as a term. However, not all ML algorithms are AI-related, nor are all AI algorithms under the ML umbrella. This distinction is of import because certain limitations of AI systems (e.g., the need for lots and lots of data) don't apply to most ML models, while AI systems tend to be more time-consuming and resource-heavy than the average ML one. There are several ML algorithms you can use without breaking the bank and derive value from your data through them. Then, if you find that you need something better, in terms of accuracy, you can explore AI-based ones. Keep in mind, however, that some ML models (e.g., Decision Trees, Random Forests, etc.) offer some transparency, while the vast majority of AI ones are black boxes. Learning more about the topic Naturally, it's hard to do this topic justice in a single article. It is so vast that someone can write a book on it! That's what I've done earlier this year, through the Technics Publications publishing house. You can learn more about this topic via this book, which is titled Julia for Machine Learning(Julia is a modern programming language used in data science, among other fields, and it's popular among various technical professionals). Feel free to check it out and explore how you can use ML in your work. Cheers!

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CAN QUANTUM COMPUTING BE THE NEW BUZZWORD

Article | December 21, 2020

Quantum Mechanics created their chapter in the history of the early 20th Century. With its regular binary computing twin going out of style, quantum mechanics led quantum computing to be the new belle of the ball! While the memory used in a classical computer encodes binary ‘bits’ – one and zero, quantum computers use qubits (quantum bits). And Qubit is not confined to a two-state solution, but can also exist in superposition i.e., qubits can be employed at 0, 1 and both 1 and 0 at the same time.

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Data Analytics vs Data Science Comparison

Article | December 21, 2020

The terms data science and data analytics are not unfamiliar with individuals who function within the technology field. Indeed, these two terms seem the same and most people use them as synonyms for each other. However, a large proportion of individuals are not aware that there is actually a difference between data science and data analytics.It is pertinent that individuals whose work revolves around these terms or the information and technology industries, should know how to use these terms in the appropriate contexts. The reason for this is quite simple: the right usage of these terms has significant impacts on the management and productivity of a business, especially in today’s rapidly data-dependent world.

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DRIVING DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION WITH RPA, ML AND WORKFLOW AUTOMATION

Article | December 21, 2020

The latest pace of advancements in technology paves way for businesses to pay attention to digital strategy in order to drive effective digital transformation. Digital strategy focuses on leveraging technology to enhance business performance, specifying the direction where organizations can create new competitive advantages with it. Despite a lot of buzz around its advancement, digital transformation initiatives in most businesses are still in its infancy.Organizations that have successfully implemented and are effectively navigating their way towards digital transformation have seen that deploying a low-code workflow automation platform makes them more efficient.

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Spotlight

Maprisk

Maprisk is a specialty data aggregator delivering location intelligence to the property & casualty insurance vertical. Talk to us at info@maprisk.com. We deliver actionable underwriting and natural hazard data via RESTful API or our custom platform. Let us help you minimize keystrokes for your distributors and maximize profits for your underwriters. Currently used by over 100 leading Insurance carrier / MGA's and 5,000+ retail agency users.

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