The Future of Storage is Here Dell EMC PowerMax

| October 12, 2018

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PowerMax rede¬nes modern storage for apps of today and tomorrow. Powerful architecture. Simple operation. Trusted innovation. POWERFUL ARCHITECTURE. NVMe done right. Multi-controller End to end NVMe NVMeoF ready Dual ported NVMe based drives Storage Class Memory ready. Industry standard technology.

Spotlight

OTIS IT Inc.

A Little Established in 2005, OTIS IT provides staff augmentation and IT CONSULTING capabilities to clients who desire to gain and maintain their competitive edge through technology. OTIS IT has established a good client base by providing services to some of the most successful companies in the United States. OTIS IT services clients in a diverse group of industries ranging from manufacturing to financial services, from mid-size companies to the Fortune 500.

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What is Data Integrity and Why is it Important?

Article | July 19, 2021

In an era of big data, data health has become a pressing issue when more and more data is being stored and processed. Therefore, preserving the integrity of the collected data is becoming increasingly necessary. Understanding the fundamentals of data integrity and how it works is the first step in safeguarding the data. Data integrity is essential for the smooth running of a company. If a company’s data is altered, deleted, or changed, and if there is no way of knowing how it can have significant impact on any data-driven business decisions. Data integrity is the reliability and trustworthiness of data throughout its lifecycle. It is the overall accuracy, completeness, and consistency of data. It can be indicated by lack of alteration between two updates of a data record, which means data is unchanged or intact. Data integrity refers to the safety of data regarding regulatory compliance- like GDPR compliance- and security. A collection of processes, rules, and standards implemented during the design phase maintains the safety and security of data. The information stored in the database will remain secure, complete, and reliable no matter how long it’s been stored; that’s when you know that the integrity of data is safe. A data integrity framework also ensures that no outside forces are harming this data. This term of data integrity may refer to either the state or a process. As a state, the data integrity framework defines a data set that is valid and accurate. Whereas as a process, it describes measures used to ensure validity and accuracy of data set or all data contained in a database or a construct. Data integrity can be enforced at both physical and logical levels. Let us understand the fundamentals of data integrity in detail: Types of Data Integrity There are two types of data integrity: physical and logical. They are collections of processes and methods that enforce data integrity in both hierarchical and relational databases. Physical Integrity Physical integrity protects the wholeness and accuracy of that data as it’s stored and retrieved. It refers to the process of storage and collection of data most accurately while maintaining the accuracy and reliability of data. The physical level of data integrity includes protecting data against different external forces like power cuts, data breaches, unexpected catastrophes, human-caused damages, and more. Logical Integrity Logical integrity keeps the data unchanged as it’s used in different ways in a relational database. Logical integrity checks data accuracy in a particular context. The logical integrity is compromised when errors from a human operator happen while entering data manually into the database. Other causes for compromised integrity of data include bugs, malware, and transferring data from one site within the database to another in the absence of some fields. There are four types of logical integrity: Entity Integrity A database has columns, rows, and tables. These elements need to be as numerous as required for the data to be accurate, but no more than necessary. Entity integrity relies on the primary key, the unique values that identify pieces of data, making sure the data is listed just once and not more to avoid a null field in the table. The feature of relational systems that store data in tables can be linked and utilized in different ways. Referential Integrity Referential integrity means a series of processes that ensure storage and uniform use of data. The database structure has rules embedded into them about the usage of foreign keys and ensures only proper changes, additions, or deletions of data occur. These rules can include limitations eliminating duplicate data entry, accurate data guarantee, and disallowance of data entry that doesn’t apply. Foreign keys relate data that can be shared or null. For example, let’s take a data integrity example, employees that share the same work or work in the same department. Domain Integrity Domain Integrity can be defined as a collection of processes ensuring the accuracy of each piece of data in a domain. A domain is a set of acceptable values a column is allowed to contain. It includes constraints that limit the format, type, and amount of data entered. In domain integrity, all values and categories are set. All categories and values in a database are set, including the nulls. User-Defined Integrity This type of logical integrity involves the user's constraints and rules to fit their specific requirements. The data isn’t always secure with entity, referential, or domain integrity. For example, if an employer creates a column to input corrective actions of the employees, this data would fall under user-defined integrity. Difference between Data Integrity and Data Security Often, the terms data security and data integrity get muddled and are used interchangeably. As a result, the term is incorrectly substituted for data integrity, but each term has a significant meaning. Data integrity and data security play an essential role in the success of each other. Data security means protecting data against unauthorized access or breach and is necessary to ensure data integrity. Data integrity is the result of successful data security. However, the term only refers to the validity and accuracy of data rather than the actual act of protecting data. Data security is one of the many ways to maintain data integrity. Data security focuses on reducing the risk of leaking intellectual property, business documents, healthcare data, emails, trade secrets, and more. Some facets of data security tactics include permissions management, data classification, identity, access management, threat detection, and security analytics. For modern enterprises, data integrity is necessary for accurate and efficient business processes and to make well-intentioned decisions. Data integrity is critical yet manageable for organizations today by backup and replication processes, database integrity constraints, validation processes, and other system protocols through varied data protection methods. Threats to Data Integrity Data integrity can be compromised by human error or any malicious acts. Accidental data alteration during the transfer from one device to another can be compromised. There is an assortment of factors that can affect the integrity of the data stored in databases. Following are a few of the examples: Human Error Data integrity is put in jeopardy when individuals enter information incorrectly, duplicate, or delete data, don’t follow the correct protocols, or make mistakes in implementing procedures to protect data. Transfer Error A transfer error occurs when data is incorrectly transferred from one location in a database to another. This error also happens when a piece of data is present in the destination table but not in the source table in a relational database. Bugs and Viruses Data can be stolen, altered, or deleted by spyware, malware, or any viruses. Compromised Hardware Hardware gets compromised when a computer crashes, a server gets down, or problems with any computer malfunctions. Data can be rendered incorrectly or incompletely, limit, or eliminate data access when hardware gets compromised. Preserving Data Integrity Companies make decisions based on data. If that data is compromised or incorrect, it could harm that company to a great extent. They routinely make data-driven business decisions, and without data integrity, those decisions can have a significant impact on the company’s goals. The threats mentioned above highlight a part of data security that can help preserve data integrity. Minimize the risk to your organization by using the following checklist: Validate Input Require an input validation when your data set is supplied by a known or an unknown source (an end-user, another application, a malicious user, or any number of other sources). The data should be validated and verified to ensure the correct input. Validate Data Verifying data processes haven’t been corrupted is highly critical. Identify key specifications and attributes that are necessary for your organization before you validate the data. Eliminate Duplicate Data Sensitive data from a secure database can easily be found on a document, spreadsheet, email, or shared folders where employees can see it without proper access. Therefore, it is sensible to clean up stray data and remove duplicates. Data Backup Data backups are a critical process in addition to removing duplicates and ensuring data security. Permanent loss of data can be avoided by backing up all necessary information, and it goes a long way. Back up the data as much as possible as it is critical as organizations may get attacked by ransomware. Access Control Another vital data security practice is access control. Individuals in an organization with any wrong intent can harm the data. Implement a model where users who need access can get access is also a successful form of access control. Sensitive servers should be isolated and bolted to the floor, with individuals with an access key are allowed to use them. Keep an Audit Trail In case of a data breach, an audit trail will help you track down your source. In addition, it serves as breadcrumbs to locate and pinpoint the individual and origin of the breach. Conclusion Data collection was difficult not too long ago. It is no longer an issue these days. With the amount of data being collected these days, we must maintain the integrity of the data. Organizations can thus make data-driven decisions confidently and take the company ahead in a proper direction. Frequently Asked Questions What are integrity rules? Precise data integrity rules are short statements about constraints that need to be applied or actions that need to be taken on the data when entering the data resource or while in the data resource. For example, precise data integrity rules do not state or enforce accuracy, precision, scale, or resolution. What is a data integrity example? Data integrity is the overall accuracy, completeness, and consistency of data. A few examples where data integrity is compromised are: • When a user tries to enter a date outside an acceptable range • When a user tries to enter a phone number in the wrong format • When a bug in an application attempts to delete the wrong record What are the principles of data integrity? The principles of data integrity are attributable, legible, contemporaneous, original, and accurate. These simple principles need to be part of a data life cycle, GDP, and data integrity initiatives. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are integrity rules?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Precise data integrity rules are short statements about constraints that need to be applied or actions that need to be taken on the data when entering the data resource or while in the data resource. For example, precise data integrity rules do not state or enforce accuracy, precision, scale, or resolution." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What is a data integrity example?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Data integrity is the overall accuracy, completeness, and consistency of data. A few examples where data integrity is compromised are: When a user tries to enter a date outside an acceptable range When a user tries to enter a phone number in the wrong format When a bug in an application attempts to delete the wrong record" } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "What are the principles of data integrity?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The principles of data integrity are attributable, legible, contemporaneous, original, and accurate. These simple principles need to be part of a data life cycle, GDP, and data integrity initiatives." } }] }

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Saurav Singla, the machine learning guru, empowering society

Article | December 10, 2020

Saurav Singla is a Senior Data Scientist, a Machine Learning Expert, an Author, a Technical Writer, a Data Science Course Creator and Instructor, a Mentor, a Speaker. While Media 7 has followed Saurav Singla’s story closely, this chat with Saurav was about analytics, his journey as a data scientist, and what he brings to the table with his 15 years of extensive statistical modeling, machine learning, natural language processing, deep learning, and data analytics across Consumer Durable, Retail, Finance, Energy, Human Resource and Healthcare sectors. He has grown multiple businesses in the past and is still a researcher at heart. In the past, Analytics and Predictive Modeling is predominant in few industries but in current times becoming an eminent part of emerging fields such as health, human resource management, pharma, IoT, and other smart solutions as well. Saurav had worked in data science since 2003. Over the years, he realized that all the people they had hired — whether they are from business or engineering backgrounds — needed extensive training to be able to perform analytics on real-world business datasets. He got an opportunity to move to Australia in the year 2003. He joined a retail company Harvey Norman in Australia, working out of their Melbourne office for four years. After moving back to India, in 2008, he joined one of the verticals of Siemens — one of the few companies in India then using analytics services in-house for eight years. He is a very passionate believer that the use of data and analytics will dramatically change not only corporations but also our societies. Building and expanding the application of analytics for supply chain, logistics, sales, marketing, finance at Siemens was a very fulfilling and enjoyable experience for him. Siemens was a tremendously rewarding and enjoyable experience for him. He grew the team from zero to fifteen while he was the data scientist leader. He believes those eight years taught him how to think big, scale organizations using data science. He has demonstrated success in developing and seamlessly executing plans in complex organizational structures. He has also been recognized for maximizing performance by implementing appropriate project management tools through analysis of details to ensure quality control and understanding of emerging technology. In the year 2016, he started getting a serious inner push to start thinking about joining a consulting and shifted to a company based out in Delhi NCR. During his ten-month path with them, he improved the way clients and businesses implement and exploit machine learning in their consumer commitments. As part of that vision, he developed class-defining applications that eliminate tension technologies, processes, and humans. Another main aspect of his plan was to ensure that it was affected in very fast agile cycles. Towards that he was actively innovating on operating and engagement models. In the year 2017, he moved to London and joined a digital technology company, and assisted in building artificial intelligence and machine learning products for their clients. He aimed to solve problems and transform the costs using technology and machine learning. He was associated with them for 2 years. At the beginning of the year 2018, he joined Mindrops. He developed advanced machine learning technologies and processes to solve client problems. Mentored the Data Science function and guide them in the development of the solution. He built robust clients Data Science capabilities which can be scalable across multiple business use cases. Outside work, Saurav associated with Mentoring Club and Revive. He volunteers in his spare time for helping, coaching, and mentoring young people in taking up careers in the data science domain, data practitioners to build high-performing teams and grow the industry. He assists data science enthusiasts to stay motivated and guide them along their career path. He helps fill the knowledge gap and help aspirants understand the core of the industry. He helps aspirants analyze their progress and help them upskill accordingly. He also helps them connect with potential job opportunities with their industry-leading network. Additionally, in the year 2018, he joined as a mentor in the Transaction Behavioral Intelligence company that accelerates business growth for banks with the use of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning enabled products. He is guiding their machine learning engineers with their projects. He is enhancing the capabilities of their AI-driven recommendation engine product. Saurav is teaching the learners to grasp data science knowledge more engaging way by providing courses on the Udemy marketplace. He has created two courses on Udemy, with over twenty thousand students enrolled in it. He regularly speaks at meetups on data science topics and writes articles on data science topics in major publications such as AI Time Journal, Towards Data Science, Data Science Central, Kdnuggets, Data-Driven Investor, HackerNoon, and Infotech Report. He actively contributes academic research papers in machine learning, deep learning, natural language processing, statistics and artificial intelligence. His book on Machine Learning for Finance was published by BPB Publications which is Asia's largest publisher of Computer and IT Books. This is possibly one of the biggest milestones of his career. Saurav turned his passion to make knowledge available for society. Saurav believes sharing knowledge is cool, and he wishes everyone should have that passion for knowledge sharing. That would be his success.

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Taking a qualitative approach to a data-driven market

Article | February 18, 2021

While digital transformation is proving to have many benefits for businesses, what is perhaps the most significant, is the vast amount of data there is available. And now, with an increasing number of businesses turning their focus to online, there is even more to be collected on competitors and markets than ever before. Having all this information to hand may seem like any business owner’s dream, as they can now make insightful and informed commercial decisions based on what others are doing, what customers want and where markets are heading. But according to Nate Burke, CEO of Diginius, a propriety software and solutions provider for ecommerce businesses, data should not be all a company relies upon when making important decisions. Instead, there is a line to be drawn on where data is required and where human expertise and judgement can provide greater value. Undeniably, the power of data is unmatched. With an abundance of data collection opportunities available online, and with an increasing number of businesses taking them, the potential and value of such information is richer than ever before. And businesses are benefiting. Particularly where data concerns customer behaviour and market patterns. For instance, over the recent Christmas period, data was clearly suggesting a preference for ecommerce, with marketplaces such as Amazon leading the way due to greater convenience and price advantages. Businesses that recognised and understood the trend could better prepare for the digital shopping season, placing greater emphasis on their online marketing tactics to encourage purchases and allocating resources to ensure product availability and on-time delivery. While on the other hand, businesses who ignored, or simply did not utilise the information available to them, would have been left with overstocked shops and now, out of season items that would have to be heavily discounted or worse, disposed of. Similarly, search and sales data can be used to understand changing consumer needs, and consequently, what items businesses should be ordering, manufacturing, marketing and selling for the best returns. For instance, understandably, in 2020, DIY was at its peak, with increases in searches for “DIY facemasks”, “DIY decking” and “DIY garden ideas”. For those who had recognised the trend early on, they had the chance to shift their offerings and marketing in accordance, in turn really reaping the rewards. So, paying attention to data certainly does pay off. And thanks to smarter and more sophisticated ways of collecting data online, such as cookies, and through AI and machine learning technologies, the value and use of such information is only likely to increase. The future, therefore, looks bright. But even with all this potential at our fingertips, there are a number of issues businesses may face if their approach relies entirely on a data and insight-driven approach. Just like disregarding its power and potential can be damaging, so can using it as the sole basis upon which important decisions are based. Human error While the value of data for understanding the market and consumer patterns is undeniable, its value is only as rich as the quality of data being inputted. So, if businesses are collecting and analysing their data on their own activity, and then using this to draw meaningful insight, there should be strong focus on the data gathering phase, with attention given to what needs to be collected, why it should be collected, how it will be collected, and whether in fact this is an accurate representation of what it is you are trying to monitor or measure. Human error can become an issue when this is done by individuals or teams who do not completely understand the numbers and patterns they are seeing. There is also an obstacle presented when there are various channels and platforms which are generating leads or sales for the business. In this case, any omission can skew results and provide an inaccurate picture. So, when used in decision making, there is the possibility of ineffective and unsuccessful changes. But while data gathering becomes more and more autonomous, the possibility of human error is lessened. Although, this may add fuel to the next issue. Drawing a line The benefits of data and insights are clear, particularly as the tasks of collection and analysis become less of a burden for businesses and their people thanks to automation and AI advancements. But due to how effortless data collection and analysis is becoming, we can only expect more businesses to be doing it, meaning its ability to offer each individual company something unique is also being lessened. So, businesses need to look elsewhere for their edge. And interestingly, this is where a line should be drawn and human judgement should be used in order to set them apart from the competition and differentiate from what everyone else is doing. It makes perfect sense when you think about it. Your business is unique for a number of reasons, but mainly because of the brand, its values, reputation and perceptions of the services you are upheld by. And it’s usually these aspects that encourage consumers to choose your business rather than a competitor. But often, these intangible aspects are much more difficult to measure and monitor through data collection and analysis, especially in the autonomous, number-driven format that many platforms utilise. Here then, there is a great case for businesses to use their own judgements, expertise and experiences to determine what works well and what does not. For instance, you can begin to determine consumer perceptions towards a change in your product or services, which quantitative data may not be able to pick up until much later when sales figures begin to rise or fall. And while the data will eventually pick it up, it might not necessarily be able to help you decide on what an appropriate alternative solution may be, should the latter occur. Human judgement, however, can listen to and understand qualitative feedback and consumer sentiments which can often provide much more meaningful insights for businesses to base their decisions on. So, when it comes to competitor analysis, using insights generated from figure-based data sets and performance metrics is key to ensuring you are doing the same as the competition. But if you are looking to get ahead, you may want to consider taking a human approach too.

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Automotive DevOps Rules of the Road Ahead

Article | March 13, 2020

DevOps will provide over-the-air (OTA), seamless software updates which would allow important and immediate updates without affecting the car’s capabilities through Liquid Software liquid software. OTA updates will enable automakers to fix engine and automotive malfunctions, as well as implement safety standards directly into the program. Tesla is one of the pioneers of over-the-air updates but while its’ cars are off. In total, Tesla’s updates are usually about 30 minutes. Since 2012, hundreds of OTA updates have been sent out by the company to adjust things like speed limit settings, acceleration, battery issues, and even braking distance. Most car manufacturers are behind when it comes to over-the-air software updates.

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Spotlight

OTIS IT Inc.

A Little Established in 2005, OTIS IT provides staff augmentation and IT CONSULTING capabilities to clients who desire to gain and maintain their competitive edge through technology. OTIS IT has established a good client base by providing services to some of the most successful companies in the United States. OTIS IT services clients in a diverse group of industries ranging from manufacturing to financial services, from mid-size companies to the Fortune 500.

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