Yearly employee surveys facing extinction like dinosaurs

| September 1, 2016

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Research has shown that employee engagement is the number one priority for CEOs. This is probably not surprising given the impact that engaged employees can have on an organization’s bottom line. A Gallup study done in 2012 concluded that in the US alone.

Spotlight

Datoniq Limited

Datoniq is a leading Qlik business intelligence consultancy based in Leicestershire in the UK. Specialising in bringing intelligence to data through the use of QlikView® and Qlik® Sense™. With existing clients ranging from SMEs to global enterprise organisations across a broad range of verticals, whether you are new to business intelligence or looking to better leverage your existing investment in QlikView, Datoniq can help you find intelligence in your data. To complement our foundation in the Qlik platform including QlikView, Qlik Sense and NPrinting, we also have a wealth of knowledge and expertise in a number of strategic, complementary software tools including QVSource, GeoQlik and QlikMaps amongst others. This allows us to advise, manage and deliver entire end-to-end business intelligence projects for our clients, eliminating the need for them to juggle multiple vendors and delivery partners.

OTHER ARTICLES

A Tale of Two Data-Centric Services

Article | April 13, 2020

The acronym DMaaS can refer to two related but separate things: data center management-as-a-service referred to here by its other acronym, DCMaaS and data management-as-a-service. The former looks at infrastructure-level questions such as optimization of data flows in a cloud service, the latter refers to master data management and data preparation as applied to federated cloud services.DCMaaS has been under development for some years; DMaaS is slightly younger and is a product of the growing interest in machine learning and big data analytics, along with increasing concern over privacy, security, and compliance in a cloud environment.DMaaS responds to a developing concern over data quality in machine learning due to the large amount of data that must be used for training and the inherent dangers posed by divergence in data structure from multiple sources. To use the rapidly growing array of cloud data, including public cloud information and corporate internal information from hybrid clouds, you must aggregate data in a normalized way so it can be available for model training and processing with ML algorithms. As data volumes and data diversity increase, this becomes increasingly difficult.

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Will We Be Able to Use AI to Prevent Further Pandemics?

Article | March 9, 2021

For many, 2021 has brought hope that they can cautiously start to prepare for a world after Covid. That includes living with the possibility of future pandemics, and starting to reflect on what has been learned from such a brutal shared experience. One of the areas that has come into its own during Covid has been artificial intelligence (AI), a technology that helped bring the pandemic under control, and allow life to continue through lockdowns and other disruptions. Plenty has been written about how AI has supported many aspects of life at work and home during Covid, from videoconferencing to online food ordering. But the role of AI in preventing Covid causing even more havoc is not necessarily as widely known. Perhaps even more importantly, little has been said about the role AI is likely to play in preparing for, responding to and even preventing future pandemics. From what we saw in 2020, AI will help prevent global outbreaks of new diseases in three ways: prediction, diagnosis and treatment. Prediction Predicting pandemics is all about tracking data that could be possible early signs that a new disease is spreading in a disturbing way. The kind of data we’re talking about includes public health information about symptoms presenting to hospitals and doctors around the world. There is already plenty of this captured in healthcare systems globally, and is consolidated into datasets such as the Johns Hopkins reports that many of us are familiar with from news briefings. Firms like Bluedot and Metabiota are part of a growing number of organisations which use AI to track both publicly available and private data and make relevant predictions about public health threats. Both of these received attention in 2020 by reporting the appearance of Covid before it had been officially acknowledged. Boston Children’s Hospital is an example of a healthcare institution doing something similar with their Healthmap resource. In addition to conventional healthcare data, AI is uniquely able to make use of informal data sources such as social media, news aggregators and discussion forums. This is because of AI techniques such as natural language processing and sentiment analysis. Firms such as Stratifyd use AI to do this in other business settings such as marketing, but also talk publicly about the use of their platform to predict and prevent pandemics. This is an example of so-called augmented intelligence, where AI is used to guide people to noteworthy data patterns, but stops short of deciding what it means, leaving that to human judgement. Another important part of preventing a pandemic is keeping track of the transmission of disease through populations and geographies. A significant issue in 2020 was difficulty tracing people who had come into contact with infection. There was some success using mobile phones for this, and AI was critical in generating useful knowledge from mobile phone data. The emphasis of Covid tracing apps in 2020 was keeping track of how the disease had already spread, but future developments are likely to be about predicting future spread patterns from such data. Prediction is a strength of AI, and the principles used to great effect in weather forecasting are similar to those used to model likely pandemic spread. Diagnosis To prevent future pandemics, it won’t be enough to predict when a disease is spreading rapidly. To make the most of this knowledge, it’s necessary to diagnose and treat cases. One of the greatest early challenges with Covid was the lack of speedy, reliable tests. For future pandemics, AI is likely to be used to create such tests more quickly than was the case in 2020. Creating a useful test involves modelling a disease’s response to different testing reagents, finding right balance between speed, convenience and accuracy. AI modelling simulates in a computer how individual cells respond to different stimuli, and could be used to perform virtual testing of many different types of test to accelerate how quickly the most promising ones reach laboratory and field trials. In 2020 there were also several novel uses of AI to diagnose Covid, but there were few national and global mechanisms to deploy these at scale. One example was the use of AI imaging, diagnosing Covid by analysing chest x-rays for features specific to Covid. This would have been especially valuable in places that didn’t have access to lab testing equipment. Another example was using AI to analyse the sound of coughs to identify unique characteristics of a Covid cough. AI research to systematically investigate innovative diagnosis techniques such as these should result in better planning for alternatives to laboratory testing. Faster and wider rollout of this kind of diagnosis would help control spread of a future disease during the critical period waiting for other tests to be developed or shared. This would be another contribution of AI to preventing a localised outbreak becoming a pandemic. Treatment Historically, vaccination has proven to be an effective tool for dealing with pandemics, and was the long term solution to Covid for most countries. AI was used to accelerate development of Covid vaccines, helping cut the development time from years or decades to months. In principle, the use of AI was similar to that described above for developing diagnostic tests. Different drug development teams used AI in different ways, but they all relied on mathematical modelling of how the Covid virus would respond to many forms of treatment at a microscopic level. Much of the vaccine research and modelling focused on the “spike” proteins that allow Covid to attack human cells and enter the body. These are also found in other viruses, and were already the subject of research before the 2020 pandemic. That research allowed scientists to quickly develop AI models to represent the spikes, and simulate the effects of different possible treatments. This was crucial in trialling thousands of possible treatments in computer models, pinpointing the most likely successes for further investigation. This kind of mathematical simulation using AI continued during drug development, and moved substantial amounts of work from the laboratory to the computer. This modelling also allowed the impact of Covid mutations on vaccines to be assessed quickly. It is why scientists were reasonably confident of developing variants of vaccines for new Covid mutations in days and weeks rather than months. As a result of the global effort to develop Covid vaccines, the body of data and knowledge about virus behaviour has grown substantially. This means it should be possible to understand new pathogens even more rapidly than Covid, potentially in hours or days rather than weeks. AI has also helped create new ways of approaching vaccine development, for example the use of pre-prepared generic vaccines designed to treat viruses from the same family as Covid. Modifying one of these to the specific features of a new virus is much faster than starting from scratch, and AI may even have already simulated exactly such a variation. AI has been involved in many parts of the fight against Covid, and we now have a much better idea than in 2020 of how to predict, diagnose and treat pandemics, especially similar viruses to Covid. So we can be cautiously optimistic that vaccine development for any future Covid-like viruses will be possible before it becomes a pandemic. Perhaps a trickier question is how well we will be able to respond if the next pandemic is from a virus that is nothing like Covid. Was Rahman is an expert in the ethics of artificial intelligence, the CEO of AI Prescience and the author of AI and Machine Learning. See more at www.wasrahman.com

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Big Data Is Helping Us Fight The Coronavirus But At What Cost To Our Privacy

Article | April 9, 2020

In some ways at least, technology has been able to tell us more about how and where the virus is spreading. Mostly, this has involved creatively harnessing the power of big data using temperature readings from smart thermometers to detect COVID-19 hot spots, or aggregating cellphone location data to point to the areas of the country where people are staying home. But against a backdrop of debate between civil liberties and public health, we also need to be asking where the line is digitally: How much surveillance is acceptable in the service of the greater good.

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MiPasa project and IBM Blockchain team on open data platform to support Covid-19 response

Article | April 1, 2020

Powerful technologies and expertise can help provide better data and help people better understand their situation. As the world contends with the ongoing coronavirus outbreak, officials battling the pandemic need tools and valid information at scale to help foster a greater sense of security for the public. As technologists, we have been heartened by the prevalence of projects such as Call for Code, hackathons and other attempts by our colleagues to rapidly create tools that might be able to help stem the crisis. But for these tools to work, they need data from sources they can validate. For example, reopening the world’s economy will likely require not only testing millions of people, but also being able to map who tested positive, where people can and can’t go and who is at exceptionally high risk of exposure and must be quarantined again.

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Spotlight

Datoniq Limited

Datoniq is a leading Qlik business intelligence consultancy based in Leicestershire in the UK. Specialising in bringing intelligence to data through the use of QlikView® and Qlik® Sense™. With existing clients ranging from SMEs to global enterprise organisations across a broad range of verticals, whether you are new to business intelligence or looking to better leverage your existing investment in QlikView, Datoniq can help you find intelligence in your data. To complement our foundation in the Qlik platform including QlikView, Qlik Sense and NPrinting, we also have a wealth of knowledge and expertise in a number of strategic, complementary software tools including QVSource, GeoQlik and QlikMaps amongst others. This allows us to advise, manage and deliver entire end-to-end business intelligence projects for our clients, eliminating the need for them to juggle multiple vendors and delivery partners.

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