Applying Big Data to Human Capital Analytics

HRResource

Big data is here. Data analysts are leveraging big data to help businesses better understand their customers, markets and operations. HR can learn and leverage some of these techniques to better understand how to attract and retain talent, engage employees, enhance managerial effectiveness and drive business performance. We will provide an overview of big data, how it is being used in the consumer world and discuss applications for the human capital world. We will also provide best practices for getting started with analytics for HR.
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Spotlight

In 1978 New York City structural engineer William LeMessurier received an odd call from a student. LeMessurier had recently unveiled the Citicorp skyscraper in Manhattan, a building with two design distinctions: a 45-degree chop at the top, as if it wore a jaunty hat, and at bottom four multistory supporting pillars placed by the sides, and not corners, of the walls. This created a remarkable view from the street — several stories above the ground, the corners of the building hung out over empty space. The engineering student, puzzled by this, had run math on what might happen when high winds hit the building, and suggested in a big storm, the entire Citicorp building might tumble down.

OTHER ON-DEMAND WEBINARS

Strategies for Fitting a Data Lake into a Modern Data Architecture

McKnight Consulting Group

Whether to take data ingestion cycles off the ETL tool and the Data Warehouse or to facilitate competitive Data Science and building algorithms in the organization, the Data Lake a place for unmodeled and vast data will be provisioned widely in 2019. Though it doesn’t have to be complicated, the Data Lake has a few key design points that are critical, and it does need to follow some principles for success. Avoid building the Data Swamp, but not the Data Lake! The tool ecosystem is building up around the Data Lake and soon many will have a robust Lake and Data Warehouse. We will discuss policy to keep them straight, send “horses to courses,” and keep up users’ confidence in the Data Platforms.
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Real-Time, Scalable Applications Powered by a Modern Data Platform

As organizations seek to deliver new applications and services, they often also need highly scalable and lightning-fast data management platforms to support these innovations. For instance, some new applications work against millions or billions of rows of data and require a response time in milliseconds. These might include financial services applications that need to process transactions with sub-millisecond response rates and be globally available.
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The Modern Toolkit for Process Excellence

info.minitab.com

See in action, using a real-world use case from manufacturing, the latest toolkit for Process Excellence, powerful analytics and machine learning.How to use the Minitab toolkit to manage projects and analyse data following the Lean Six Sigma DMAIC structured approach.Discover how to power and digitalise your improvement projects and data analysis with best practice methods combined with intuitive tools.Explore how to solve problems and suggest innovations with whatever data you currently have available.Includes helpful examples of the capabilities and uses for Minitab Statistical Software, Companion by Minitab for project execution and tracking Continuous Improvement, and Salford Predictive Modeler Software for predictive analytics and machine learning.
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Securing Mission Critical PostgreSQL Data

Is your team responsible for developing scalable enterprise applications on PostgreSQL databases? Does your company’s current infrastructure lack the ability to recover rapidly from a disaster, data loss, or even a cyber attack like ransomware? Are you looking for industry-leading technologies that can enable fast recovery of mission-critical application data? Is your team measured on recovery point and time objectives for new digital transformation initiatives?
Watch Now

Spotlight

In 1978 New York City structural engineer William LeMessurier received an odd call from a student. LeMessurier had recently unveiled the Citicorp skyscraper in Manhattan, a building with two design distinctions: a 45-degree chop at the top, as if it wore a jaunty hat, and at bottom four multistory supporting pillars placed by the sides, and not corners, of the walls. This created a remarkable view from the street — several stories above the ground, the corners of the building hung out over empty space. The engineering student, puzzled by this, had run math on what might happen when high winds hit the building, and suggested in a big storm, the entire Citicorp building might tumble down.

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