Data and Analytics Trends for 2019 and Beyond: A Panel Discussion

Gartner

Discussion Topics:
- How effective are your current data and analytics initiatives
- What trends will most impact how you utilize data and analytics in 2019 and beyond
- What must you do to maximize data and analytics in your organization
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Spotlight

Cyber criminals are becoming more sophisticated at picking our virtual pockets. And most of us remain woefully unprepared.According to a 2016 survey conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers, organizations rank cybercrime as the second most reported type of economic crime, up from fourth place. (It’s worth noting that most cybercrimes go unreported.)In the survey, 32 percent of organizations admitted they had been a victim of cybercrime and 34 percent expected to become a victim in the next two years. Only 37 percent had a plan to respond to these incidents.Such stats indicate widespread denial in the face of a growing problem. Online crime has way beyond teenage hackers pushing boundaries and into elaborate worldwide syndicates that are well organized and use sophisticated tools. They steal personal data, passwords and other information, then use it to blackmail businesses or scam consumers. Or they might sell it on the black market, where others can use it to steal identities and run up credit card charges.Here are 10 of the most notable cybercrimes, either by size or significance. They illustrate the growing threat to businesses, consumers and governments.Rarely a week goes by without news of another data breach at another corporation. And cyber thieves are taking different types of data and doing more things with them

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The Internet of Things, social media and enterprise content all have one thing in common: they generate vast quantities of data — ever-faster. So much so that picking out relevant information and assembling it into meaningful patterns is a tall order. These new data sources also present another challenge. They generate unstructured data - such as text and emojis - that don’t fit neatly into traditional database structures. This data can however hold valuable insights on important and hard-to-quantify concepts such as social sentiment.
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Data Catalogs are Essential But Can they be Fun?

alation.com

In an age of data lakes, enterprise data catalogs are becoming a necessity. Done right, machine learning data catalogs can facilitate discoverability and ensure compliance while fostering the user engagement needed to build a robust data culture. In this webinar, Andrew Brust, analyst at GigaOm Research, and Aaron Kalb, co-founder and chief data officer at Alation, discuss why people are an essential part of successful self-service analytics, and how data catalogs can help foster collaboration and analytics enthusiasm.
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Spotlight

Cyber criminals are becoming more sophisticated at picking our virtual pockets. And most of us remain woefully unprepared.According to a 2016 survey conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers, organizations rank cybercrime as the second most reported type of economic crime, up from fourth place. (It’s worth noting that most cybercrimes go unreported.)In the survey, 32 percent of organizations admitted they had been a victim of cybercrime and 34 percent expected to become a victim in the next two years. Only 37 percent had a plan to respond to these incidents.Such stats indicate widespread denial in the face of a growing problem. Online crime has way beyond teenage hackers pushing boundaries and into elaborate worldwide syndicates that are well organized and use sophisticated tools. They steal personal data, passwords and other information, then use it to blackmail businesses or scam consumers. Or they might sell it on the black market, where others can use it to steal identities and run up credit card charges.Here are 10 of the most notable cybercrimes, either by size or significance. They illustrate the growing threat to businesses, consumers and governments.Rarely a week goes by without news of another data breach at another corporation. And cyber thieves are taking different types of data and doing more things with them

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